+
Education

Custodian who wanted to 'do something for the kids' gets certified to become a teacher

He can't wait to start inspiring his students.

stephen hansell, custodian to teacher, klein isd

Teacher Stephen Hansell.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with being a custodian at a school. Custodians are the backbones that keep things running smoothly and they have to be real jacks of all trades.

After leaving the Navy and trying his hand at a few different careers, Stephen Hansell decided he wanted to work for the high school that he attended as a teenager, Klein Oak High School in Harris County, Texas, he told Fox News Houston.

“I wanted to work for Klein ISD so that I could do something for the kids. Anything would do, as long as I could do my part,” Hansell told 11 Alive. So he took a job as the school’s custodian and developed a real love for the school, its faculty and students.


After two years of working as a custodian, Hansell realized his true passion. "It's going to sound a little cliché, but shortly after becoming a custodian, I had a dream that I was teaching," Hansell told Fox News Houston. It was a noble idea but being a teacher and custodian are two different skill sets.

Hansell wondered how to make the leap from the janitor’s room to the classroom.

“I eventually researched what I needed to do to become a teacher and am now in the Inspire Texas certification program with Region 4,” he told the Klein ISD.Inspire Texas has a teacher certification program that provides online and in-person instruction to help people become educators who will "inspire Texas children to develop their potential."

Over the next two years, Hansell went through 300 hours of training, 30 hours of in-class observations and coursework before passing his exams.

On August 10, Hansell will start teaching Texas history to seventh graders at Klein ISD's Krimmel Intermediate and he can’t wait to inspire his students. “I’m excited for that first lightbulb moment where the student doesn’t understand something, I explain it, and they finally get it,” Hansell told 11 Alive. “It’s going to be the coolest thing ever knowing that I got to be a part of that and have that opportunity.”

Hansell says that going through the alternative credential program was “rough.” But he made it through the program, thanks to the support he received from his co-workers at Klein Oak. “The care they have shown along the way has motivated me to see this dream through," Hansell told 11 Alive.

After 180 days on the job, Hansell will become an official certified teacher in the state of Texas.

Hansell's story is a wonderful example of someone who embodies the true spirit of education because, as the old saying goes, “Never cease to learn, until you cease to live.” Hansell saw an opportunity and pushed through the program in two years, while working at the same time, to set himself up for a career that he loves. It’s a reminder that we all have the ability to make big changes in our lives as long as we can dream big and find the courage to make it happen.

Pop Culture

One moment in history shot Tracy Chapman to music stardom. Watch it now.

She captivated millions with nothing but her guitar and an iconic voice.

Imagine being in the crowd and hearing "Fast Car" for the first time

While a catchy hook might make a song go viral, very few songs create such a unifying impact that they achieve timeless resonance. Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car” is one of those songs.

So much courage and raw honesty is packed into the lyrics, only to be elevated by Chapman’s signature androgynous and soulful voice. Imagine being in the crowd and seeing her as a relatively unknown talent and hearing that song for the first time. Would you instantly recognize that you were witnessing a pivotal moment in musical history?

For concert goers at Wembley Stadium in the late 80s, this was the scenario.

Keep ReadingShow less

A guy with road rage screaming out of his car.

A psychologist who’s an expert in narcissism has released a telling video that reveals one of the red flags of the disorder, being an erratic driver.

"Most people, when they tell the story backwards of a narcissistic relationship, are able to see the red flags very clearly,” Dr. Ramani said in her video. “However, seeing them forwards isn't hard. But if you see them too late, it means you've already been through the narcissistic relationship, you're devastated and have likely wasted a lot of time."

Dr. Ramani Durvasula is a licensed clinical psychologist in Los Angeles, Professor Emerita of Psychology at California State University and author of several books, including “Should I Stay or Should I Go: Surviving A Relationship with a Narcissist.”

Keep ReadingShow less

Finally, someone explains why we all need subtitles

It seems everyone needs subtitles nowadays in order to "hear" the television. This is something that has become more common over the past decade and it's caused people to question if their hearing is going bad or if perhaps actors have gotten lazy with enunciation.

So if you've been wondering if it's just you who needs subtitles in order to watch the latest marathon-worthy show, worry no more. Vox video producer Edward Vega interviewed dialogue editor Austin Olivia Kendrick to get to the bottom of why we can't seem to make out what the actors are saying anymore. It turns out it's technology's fault, and to get to how we got here, Vega and Kendrick took us back in time.

They first explained that way back when movies were first moving from silent film to spoken dialogue, actors had to enunciate and project loudly while speaking directly into a large microphone. If they spoke and moved like actors do today, it would sound almost as if someone were giving a drive-by soliloquy while circling the block. You'd only hear every other sentence or two.

Keep ReadingShow less
www.youtube.com

Man hailed 'Highway Hero' for running across four lanes of traffic

Holy cow, Bat Man! You're always supposed to be aware of other vehicles when you're driving but what do you do when you notice someone has lost consciousness while speeding down the highway?

It's a scenario that no one wants to see play out, but for Adolfo Molina, the scenario became reality and he didn't hesitate to spring into action. Molina was driving down the highway when he spotted a woman in a blue car who lost consciousness as her car careened down the shoulder of the highway. The concerned driver quickly pulled over in order to attempt to rescue the woman.

But there was a problem, he had to cross four lanes of traffic on the highway just to make it to the woman's still moving car. That obstacle didn't stop him. Molina sprinted across the highway, crossing right in front of a black pick up truck before running at full speed to attempt to open the woman's door and stop her car.

Keep ReadingShow less
Internet

Relationship expert tells people to never get married unless you're willing to do 3 things

"If you and your partner (both) are unable or unwilling to do these 3 things consistently forever, you won’t make it."

Relationship expert gives people advice on getting married.

Being in a relationship can be difficult at times. Learning someone else's quirks, boundaries, and deep views on the world can be eye-opening and hard. But usually, the happy chemicals released in our brain when we love someone can cause us to overlook things in order to keep the peace.

Jayson Gaddis, a relationship expert, took to Twitter to rip off people's rose-colored glasses and tell them to forego marriage. Honestly, with the divorce rate in this country being as high as it is, he probably could've stopped his tweet right there. Don't get married, the end. Many people would've probably related and not questioned the bold statement, but thankfully he followed up with three things you must be willing to do before going to the chapel.

Before going into his reasons for why he tells people not to get married, Gaddis explained that he is a person that "LOVEs being married." I mean, it would probably make him a pretty weird relationship expert if he hated relationships, so it's probably a good thing he enjoys being married. Surely his spouse appreciates his stance as well.

Keep ReadingShow less

Humanitarian Helen Keller circa 1920.

In a 1954 documentary short, humanitarian Helen Keller expressed that her greatest regret in life was being unable to speak clearly. But given that she could not see or hear, her speech was quite remarkable.

Keller was born in 1880 and, at the age of 18 months, contracted an unknown illness that left her deaf and blind. But with the help of her teacher, Anne Sullivan, she was able to overcome her disabilities and become an outspoken advocate for the voiceless and oppressed.

Keep ReadingShow less