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Sierra Club

Jared Leto: Is there anything he can't do?

Aside from being the lead singer and guitarist for the award-winning rock band Thirty Seconds to Mars...



GIF from the music video for "A Beautiful Lie" by Thirty Seconds to Mars, which was actually filmed on a glacier.


...he's also an Academy Award-winning actor (and occasionally punching bag)...

GIF from "Fight Club."

...and a former teenage heartthrob.

GIF from "My So-Called Life."

Now he can add "Virtual Reality Tour Guide" to his resume as well.

Perhaps you've felt emotionally or metaphorically transported by the sound of Jared Leto's voice.

But thanks to a new collaboration between RYOT and the Sierra Club, you can be physically transported as well.

GIFs via RYOT/Sierra Club.

This short interactive film, titled "Act in Paris," immerses the viewer in a 360° tour of Alaska's gorgeous melting glaciers.

Don't worry — you don't need one of those big clunky virtual reality helmets or Google Cardboard or any other extra-fancy tech to enjoy the experience.

As with all YouTube 360 videos, you can use the directional buttons on the screen or the arrow keys on your keyboard to guide your way around the glacier while you listen to the mellow tone of Leto's voice.

You can also download the RYOT VR app and experience the whole thing on your smartphone, either by touching the screen...

...or by literally spinning around the room (although you might get some weird looks).

Pretty cool, right? But what does a VR tour of Alaska have to do with Paris?

This December, the United Nations is hosting a massive climate action conference in Paris with the goal of bringing the world together to enter into a universal and legally binding agreement to fight climate change before it's too late.

As for Alaska, it's ground zero for climate change damage, along with the rest of the Arctic Circle.

As Jared Leto's serene voice will tell you during your immersive video tour, melting glaciers and rising temperatures have had a devastating impact on the Arctic, and it's only getting worse.

The inside of a melting glacier.

Alaska's scenic landscapes show us just how bad the damage is — and what's in store for the rest of us if we don't act.

The Arctic Circle might seem remote, but the effects of climate change have left their mark on the rest of the world as well. It's not quite as apparent yet, but it is happening — and it's happening exponentially faster as the Arctic gets worse.

So as you soak in the sights on your virtual tour, consider what would happen if it all just disappeared.

And if by some chance you aren't feeling moved by the jaw-dropping beauty of the Arctic Circle, consider that wherever you live, the exact same things are happening all around you, whether you notice them or not. Check it out:

The time has come for us to make a difference — because we might not have another chance to stop the damage.

Visit ActInParis.org to find out more and to demand that the world's leaders come together with an action plan while they still can.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Alberto Cartuccia Cingolani wows audiences with his amazing musical talents.

Mozart was known for his musical talent at a young age, playing the harpsichord at age 4 and writing original compositions at age 5. So perhaps it's fitting that a video of 5-year-old piano prodigy Alberto Cartuccia Cingolani playing Mozart has gone viral as people marvel at his musical abilities.

Alberto's legs can't even reach the pedals, but that doesn't stop his little hands from flying expertly over the keys as incredible music pours out of the piano at the 10th International Musical Competition "Città di Penne" in Italy. Even if you've seen young musicians play impressively, it's hard not to have your jaw drop at this one. Sometimes a kid comes along who just clearly has a gift.

Of course, that gift has been helped along by two professional musician parents. But no amount of teaching can create an ability like this.

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TikTok about '80s childhood is a total Gen X flashback.

As a Gen X parent, it's weird to try to describe my childhood to my kids. We're the generation that didn't grow up with the internet or cell phones, yet are raising kids who have never known a world without them. That difference alone is enough to make our 1980s childhoods feel like a completely different planet, but there are other differences too that often get overlooked.

How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

And '80s hair? With the feathered bangs and the terrible perms and the crunchy hair spray? What, why and how?

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