The Washington Post’s pop music critic Chris Richards — who is married to Washington Post feature writer Caitlin Gibson — celebrated a “not uncommon, but always cool” moment in his marriage: The husband-and-wife duo each had stories running on the same page of the paper’s Style section.

The stories could hardly be more different in tone or subject matter: Gibson focused on a young girl’s heartbreaking firsthand Twitter accounts of war-ravaged Syria (“The tooth fairy is afraid of the bombing here, it run away to its hole”).  

Richards drummed up some juicy Grammy drama in a piece about Beyoncé and Adele. Yet internet trolls found reasons to leave disturbing messages in both writers’ inboxes.


Richards noticed a stark difference between the hate mail he and his wife received: Hers was rife with sexist name-calling while the insults he received were mainly limited to perceived faults in his story, not his gender.

In addition to shining a light on sexism, Richards’ foray into Twitter commentary taught him another valuable lesson: Counting isn’t his strong suit.

Meanwhile, Gibson cheered on her husband’s statements.

Though 2016 has three more weeks to go, we’ll go ahead and say it: This reporter pair is our GOOD Couple of the Year.

This article originally appeared on GOOD.

For some people, every day is Independence Day. For Janis Shinwari, this will be his first 4th of July as an American citizen. And boy, he earned it.

"If I was in Afghanistan—if I didn't come here, I wouldn't be alive now. I would be dead." Shinwari told CNN Heroes in 2018. Shinwari risked his life for nine years serving as a translator for U.S. forces in his native country of Afghanistan. He risked his life everyday knowing that should he be caught by the Taliban, the consequences would be severe. "If the Taliban catch you, they will torture you in front of your kids and families and make a film of you." Shinwari said. "Then [they'll] send it to other translators as a warning message to stop working with the American forces."

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