A children's hospital turned its patients into superheroes for a day: 11 amazing photos.
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Superheroes come in all shapes and sizes.

Some are masked muscle-heads who battle diabolical villains. Others are much smaller but face even more menacing foes — like life-threatening accidents or illnesses.

Both can wear super-cool capes.


All photos by Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, used with permission.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta celebrated these pint-sized heroes by dressing the entire city in colorful capes.

It all started with a little girl named Hudson Lillystone, who began a battle with leukemia when she was only 4. To get through her grueling chemotherapy sessions, she liked to summon extra bravery by dressing like her favorite superheroes.

And it worked.

Hudson is finishing up the last of her chemo at the Aflac Cancer Center of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, and her prognosis currently looks great.

For the 100th anniversary of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, "Super" Hudson helped pass out capes to the other kids so they could feel like heroes, too.

Uber Atlanta even pitched in to give Hudson and some of her icons a ride to school...


...where all of her friends were waiting for her in capes of their own.

But it didn't stop there. A few dancers from the Atlanta Ballet showed their support (and some sweet moves, too).

A diver at the Georgia Aquarium even got in on the action ... underwater!

And, of course, Atlanta's "brave" baseball team joined the fun, too.

Support for the kids flooded in all day on social media.

Thousands of people posted pictures of themselves wearing capes using the hashtag #CapeDayATL. Uber drivers all over Atlanta delivered capes on demand, with a portion of the proceeds going to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta to save more lives.

Thousands of ordinary citizens answered the call. It was like something straight out of a comic book, and it was incredible.

Having a life-threatening illness like cancer is frightening for anyone, but it's especially tough on kids.

Joanne Wolfe, director of palliative care at Boston Children's Hospital, writes that it's incredibly important for doctors to focus on the treatment experience along with the psychological well-being of these kids. In other words, they need to know they're not in it alone, and that they are going to win the battle.

Hopefully, seeing the city of Atlanta rally behind them gave some of these amazing kids the courage to keep fighting.

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Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

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via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

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Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

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