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9 must-see patriarchy-smashing moments from the 2017 Golden Globes.

"I think the world could do with a few more women in the center of it."

9 must-see patriarchy-smashing moments from the 2017 Golden Globes.

At the 74th Golden Globes, the patriarchy was smashed so many times, a sexist army of misogynistic sexists couldn't have put it back together.

A number of women received accolades for their incredible work, while also taking public stands against misogyny and bigotry over and over and over again. Well done, 2017, you're off to a not-totally-terrible start.

From same-sex kisses on the red carpet to gendered fashion statements, we've seen blips of such expression at awards shows in the past, but it's difficult to recall another award show so ripe with memorable feminist moments.


Here are nine of our favorite instances of patriarchy-smashing from the 2017 Golden Globes:

1. Evan Rachel Wood rocked one smokin' hot suit.

Hello, gorgeous! Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

Sure, Wood isn't the first woman to sport a suit at an awards show (let's not forget the illustrious Diane Keaton), but she made the decision to wear this custom Altuzarra suit to send a powerful message to any girls watching at home.

She told USA Today:

"I decided early in the year not to wear any dresses to awards shows to be a gentle reminder to young girls and women that you're not required one if you don't want to, to really be yourself and that your worth is more than the dresses that you wear."

2. Sarah Paulson and Amanda Peet's BFF red carpet kiss.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

Sarah Paulson (who is currently in a relationship with Holland Taylor) and Amanda Peet are not dating, nor was their kiss a stunt for publicity (although it definitely received a ton). It was just the friendly way these two BFFs decided to greet each other on the red carpet.

It also wasn't the first time the friends kissed publicly, so it suggests they're simply trying to do their part to make such a loving gesture part of the norm rather than elicit the standard "OMG two women kissing" reaction.

3. Tracee Ellis Ross dedicated her award to "all the women, women of color, and colorful people whose stories, ideas, thoughts are not always considered worthy and valid and important."

Ross is the first black woman to win a Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy, since Debbie Allen in 1983. Not to mention she's a 44-year-old black actress looking fierce and casually killing it in Hollywood. It's definitely time to check out "Blackish" on ABC if you haven't already.

4. Everything Viola Davis said.

Photo by Roberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

There was literally nothing Davis said at the Globes that wasn't awe-inspiring. She continues to bust through glass ceilings, and she does it with power and grace.

She won Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture Drama for "Fences," but the highlight of the night was her epic speech honoring a fellow female giant in Hollywood: Meryl Streep.

"You make me proud to be an artist," Davis told Streep. "You make me feel that what I have in me — my body, my face, my age — is enough.”

Which brings us to...

5. Meryl Streep's kickass Cecil B. DeMille Award acceptance speech.

Watch the whole thing. No additional comment necessary.

6. Claire Foy's acceptance speech for winning Best Actress in a TV Series Drama for her role in Netflix's "The Crown."

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Foy won for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II — a woman who ascends to the throne and quickly learns how to work within the patriarchy while also subverting it just by doing her job.

Appropriately, Foy's speech honored the Queen, but she added an important sentiment to the end saying: "I think the world could do with a few more women in the center of it."

If this Golden Globes is any indication, Foy's sentiment is well on its way to reality.

7. Ryan Gosling's recognition of his supportive partner, actress Eva Mendes.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Gosling has spoken about gender equality before, but his heartfelt acknowledgement to the hard work his partner Eva Mendes did "behind the scenes" so that he could shoot Golden Globe Award-winning film "La La Land" was a wonderful reminder of what it looks like when people acknowledge the often invisible work women do.

"If [Mendes] hadn't have taken all that on so I could have this experience, it would surely be someone else up here other than me today," Gosling told the crowd. That kind of support from a partner is definitely worth shouting out.

8. Lola Kirke's "F*ck Paul Ryan" pin and glorious underarm hair.

Photo by Ari Perilstein/Getty Images.

Who says award shows aren't a time to make your political opinions known? Kirke even matched hers to her dress! She supported women's rights to do whatever they want with their own bodies by confidently sporting underarm hair on the red carpet as well as a small pin that read "F*ck Paul Ryan."

9. Octavia Spencer spoke about the importance of getting girls involved in STEM fields.

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

Spencer's involvement in the movie "Hidden Figures" — which tells the story of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson, three black women working at NASA who were integral in getting the first men into space — has been a box office success so far. That kind of turnout is great because it means a huge audience is learning about a part of history often not taught in schools.

At the Globes she told told reporters that she hopes "future STEM girls will be inspired by our movie."

Public events are always the right time to make waves for feminism and equality and to take a stand against bigotry.

The more people see these acts, the more chance they have of making a lasting impression and changing things for the better in this country. With an incoming president, cabinet, House of Representatives, and Senate brimming with people looking to strip women, people of color, and other marginalized groups of their rights, we need as many of these patriarchy-smashing moments as possible.

As long as we keep publicly standing up for what's right, whatever our race, gender, or economic status may be, those who wish to put us down will not win.

Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves
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It can be expensive to have a pet. It's possible to spend between $250 to $700 a year on food for a dog and around $120-$500 on food for a cat. But of course, most of us don't think twice about the expense: having a pet is worth it because of the company animals provide.

But for some, this expense is hard to keep up, no matter how much you adore your fur baby. And that's why Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves decided to help.

Kenneth had seen a man scraping together change in a store to buy pet food, so he offered to buy the man some extra pet food. Still, later that night he couldn't stop thinking about the experience — he worried the man wasn't just struggling to pay for pet food, but food for himself, too.

So he went home and told his wife — and immediately, they both knew they needed to do something. So, in December 2020, they converted a farm stand into a take-what-you-need, leave-what-you-can Pet Food pantry.

"A lot of people would have watched that man count out change to buy pet food. Some may have helped him out like my husband did," Jill says. "A few may have thought about it afterward. But, only someone like Kenny would turn that experience into what we have today."

"If it weren't for his generous spirit and his penchant for a plan, the pantry would never have been born," she adds.

A man with sunglasses hands a box of cat food to a woman smiling Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

At first, the couple started the pet food pantry with a couple hundred dollars of pet food they bought themselves. And to make sure people knew about the pantry, they set up a Facebook page for the pantry, then went to other Facebook groups, such as a "Buy Nothing group," and shared what they were doing.

"When we started, we weren't even sure people would use us," Jill says. "At best, we were hoping to be able to provide enough to help people get through the holidays."

But, thanks to their page and word of mouth, news spread about what they were doing, and the donations of more pet food started flooding in, too. Before long, they were coming home to stacks of food — and within a couple of months, the pantry was full.

Yellow post-it note with handwritten note that reads: "Hi, I read your story on Facebook. Here is a small donation to help. I have a 3-year-old yellow lab who I adore. I hope this helps someone in need. Merry Christmas. Meredith" Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

"The pounds of food we have gone through is well, well, well into the thousands," Jill says. "The orders from our Amazon Wish List alone include several hundred pounds of dry food, a couple of hundred cases of canned food, and thousands of treats and toys. But, that does not even take into account the hundreds of drop-offs, online orders, and monetary donations we have received."

They also got many 'Thank you notes' from the people they helped.

"I would like to thank you for helping us feed our fur babies," one note read. "My husband and I recently lost our jobs, and my husband [will] hopefully [find] a new one. We are just waiting for a call."

Another read: "I just need to say thank you from the bottom of my heart. I haven't worked in over a month with a two-year-old at home. Dad brings in about $300/week. From the pandemic to Christmas, it has been tough. But with the help of beautiful people like you, my fur baby can now eat a little bit longer, and my heart is happy."

Jill says that she thinks the fact that the pet pantry is a farm stand helps people feel better.

A woman holding a small black dog and looking at the camera is greeted by Jill Gonsalves Photo courtesy of Kenneth and Jill Gonsalves

"When we first started this, someone who visited us mentioned how it made them feel good to be able to browse without feeling like they were being watched," she says. "So, it's been important to us to maintain that integrity."

Jill and Kenneth aren't sure how many people they've helped so far, but they know that their pet food pantry is doing what they hoped it would. "The pet owners who visit us, much like donations, come in ebbs and flows," Jill says. "We have some regulars who have been with us since the beginning. We also have some people that come a few times, and we never see again."

"Our hope is that they used us while they were in a tough spot, but they don't need us anymore. In a funny way, the greatest thing would be if no one needed us anymore."


Today, the Acushnet Pet Pantry is still going strong, but its stock is running low. If you want to help out, visit their Facebook page for updates and to find ways to donate.
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Dr. David McPhee offers advice for talking to someone living in a different time in their head.

Few things are more difficult than watching a loved one's grip on reality slipping away. Dementia can be brutal for families and caregivers, and knowing how to handle the various stages can be tricky to figure out.

The Alzheimer's Association offers tips for communicating in the early, middle and late stages of the disease, as dementia manifests differently as the disease progresses. The Family Caregiver Alliance also offers advice for talking to someone with various forms and phases of dementia. Some communication tips deal with confusion, agitation and other challenging behaviors that can come along with losing one's memory, and those tips are incredibly important. But what about when the person is seemingly living in a different time, immersed in their memories of the past, unaware of what has happened since then?

Psychologist David McPhee shared some advice with a person on Quora who asked, "How do I answer my dad with dementia when he talks about his mom and dad being alive? Do I go along with it or tell him they have passed away?"

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When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!