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6 words from a 5-year-old girl show exactly why diversity matters in Hollywood.

We're all beautiful. It's just that some of us don't see that on TV ... but that's changing.

6 words from a 5-year-old girl show exactly why diversity matters in Hollywood.

A young girl was watching the TV show "The Flash" and saw something really special and cool.

GIF via "The Flash."


A guy who runs so fast he looks like a laser? Nope. That wasn't it. For a TV show based on a comic, that actually isn't all that special. But here's what is pretty amazing:

The little girl saw someone who actually looks like her.

Specifically, she saw actress Candice Patton, who plays Iris Allen West on "The Flash."

Iris is the Flash's love interest, but also his childhood friend, cohort, and confidante. Image by Gage Skidmore/Flickr (altered).

It's not that often that you see women of different colors and complexions in comics, much less on TV.

For kids like this young fan, seeing herself in characters wasn't exactly common. But man, when it did happen, it had an impact.


"Iris looks like me, we're beautiful."

Not only did she get to see someone who looks like her being strong and funny in this superhero world, she saw someone who looked like her being beautiful. And that made her feel beautiful too.

Who knew? Diversity can help people feel more beautiful?

According to this 5-year-old fan and her mom, the answer is a resounding YES.

But that's not the end of the story.

When Patton saw that sweet note from a mom on Twitter, she wanted to do something special...

PRESENTS!!!


But where are the Iris action figures???

Because of characters like Candice Patton's Iris, so many other lil' munchkins (and older folks too!) are finally getting a chance to recognize themselves in their favorite shows.


And THAT is truly beautiful.

Living a simple and happy life, Chow Yun-fat plans to give his around $700 million fortune to charity, Hong Kong movie site Jayne Stars reported.

Chow Yun Fat was born in Lamma Island, Hong Kong, to a mother who was a cleaning lady and vegetable farmer, and a father who worked on a Shell Oil Company tanker. Chow grew up in a farming community, in a house with no electricity.

He would wake at dawn each morning to help his mother sell herbal jelly and Hakka tea-pudding on the streets; in the afternoons, he went to work in the fields.

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