+

Donald Trump has announced he will pull the United States from the Paris climate accord.

Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images.

The decision, which comes from an administration with virtually no science advisors, runs counter to pretty much every other industrialized country in the world and a 5-to-1 consensus among voters that we should stay in the agreement.


The Paris deal is a voluntary agreement, signed in 2015, in which 197 countries agreed to try to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions with the goal of keeping global warming under 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

Trump's decision did not go unnoticed on Twitter, where people rained down fire.

Multiple people covered the crowds that were gathering outside the White House.

Elon Musk, who had threatened to leave Trump's presidential council if we left Paris, jumped in:

And Leo DiCaprio gave some advice for all who were shocked and upset by the news.

Meanwhile, news organizations provided some helpful context.

CNN introduced America to our illustrious new group of neighbors.

The only two countries that didn't sign were Nicaragua, which actually wanted to do more, and Syria, which is the middle of a civil war.

In what must have been one of Trump's proudest sound bites, he said he was elected to represent Pittsburgh, not Paris. Some people couldn't resist pointing a couple things out.

Including the city's mayor.

Other local and state level government officials also joined in, letting the country know that they're committed to Paris, no matter what Trump says.

Both New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo made sure their city and state knew they were in this for the long haul, as did Gov. Jerry Brown in California.

Bernie Sanders also chimed in.

Barack Obama, who signed the agreement back in 2015, called on everyone to do their part.

"I'm confident that our states, cities, and businesses will step up and do even more to lead the way," the former president wrote.

The message is clear. This was a dumb move, but the Paris agreement — and the hopes and drive behind it — will survive.

The European Union and China as well as numerous American states and cities have all vowed to abide by the plan's regulations, no matter what Trump does on a federal level. The fact is, the U.S. is already shifting to cleaner fuels and renewables, and solar power now employs more people than coal.

Plus, the Paris climate deal is scheduled to come into force on Nov. 4, 2020. Coincidentally, right after the next Election Day.

via FIRST

FIRST students learn real-world career skills through robotics competitions.

True

In today’s rapidly changing world, most parents are concerned about what the future looks like for their children. Whether concerning technology, culture, or values, young people today are expected to navigate—and attempt to thrive in—a society that’s far more complicated than that of their parents. It’s one of the reasons why parents are keen to involve their kids in activities that will help them become more resilient, well-rounded and better prepared for life when they enter adulthood.

One such activity is FIRST®, a volunteer-based global robotics community that helps young people discover a passion for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through exciting, multifaceted challenges. FIRST helps kids ages 4 to 18 to build confidence, resilience, cooperation and empathy as they compete and collaborate with one another.

You may have seen the transformative power of FIRST programs featured in the new 2022 Disney+ documentary “More Than Robots.”

Keep ReadingShow less
via Pexels

Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

Keep ReadingShow less
Joy

Save dogs & farm animals all before your morning cup of coffee

A quality coffee roaster that makes a difference

Tackling anything before you finish your first cup of joe seems like a tall order, but with Hugo Coffee Roasters you can turn your morning ritual into an act of kindness. This female-founded, fair trade organic coffee roaster partners with different organizations to help save the lives of rescue dogs and farm animals. Here's how they do it:

Keep ReadingShow less

One of these things is not like the other.

Sometimes, life can unexpectedly snatch you away from safety and thrust you into imminent danger. Other times, life can just as quickly turn a dire circumstance into a heartwarming miracle.

Such was the case for a baby hawk who went from being dinner to being adopted by a family of bald eagles near the city of Nanaimo in British Columbia, Canada. The amazing moment was captured by a 24-hour livestream webcam run by GROWLS, a nonprofit organization that helps rescue and rehabilitate injured wildlife.

The video shows the seemingly doomed baby hawk being tossed into an eaglet’s nest. Pam McCartney, a GROWLS volunteer who had been watching the livestream at the time, braced herself.

"Usually when I watch, like, David Attenborough and his shows, I can close my eyes or fast forward or whatever, but this was live at the time, and I was just like, oh, my gosh, oh, my gosh," she told CBC.

Much to her surprise, nature seemed to have something else in mind.

Keep ReadingShow less