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Joy

10 things that made us smile this week

Upworthy's weekly roundup of joy and delight.

joy, uplifting, goodness

From stellar sportsmanship to corntastic kiddos to adorable animals, enjoy the best of the internet this week.

Wait. Are we really almost halfway through August already? Didn't I just write one of these intros talking about how summer had arrived? What the heck happened???

Time flies when you're having fun, I guess, and these weekly roundups are nothing but fun. Every day it seems like we're bombarded with something new to stress about or be outraged over, but not here. In this space, we celebrate simple joys, awesome humans, hilarious animals and all things smile-worthy.

This week alone, we've seen sportsmanship that inspired us, parenting that touched our hearts and kiddos that tickled our funny bones. Readers have told us they look forward to our 10 things roundup every week, which is good because we have no intention of stopping. (Honestly, it's therapeutic to pull this list together, so win-win all around!)


So kick back, relax and let these 10 little tidbits of goodness carry you through this final stretch of summer.

1. A Little League player comforted the opposing team's pitcher after his errant pitch hit him in the head.

This is some seriously awesome sportsmanship from both of these boys, putting caring and compassion over competition. Love to see it. Read the full story here.

2. Motion-activated home security camera caught this fierce beast on the premises.

It's that head tilt in the last 10 seconds that really makes this video. Such a good doggo.

3. Woody Harrelson wrote a hilarious poem for his random baby look-alike.

Cora's mom shared her photo alongside Woody's and he not only reshared it on Instagram, but wrote Cora a delightful little poem joking about how he wished he had her hair. What a guy. Read the full story here.

4. Dad's response to his daughter's skateboard crash is a masterclass in awesome parenting.

The way he asked if she was scared or hurt, the way he balanced empathy with empowerment and how he encouraged her but left the choice totally in her hands … seriously good stuff. "Ultimately I just respond from the heart," he wrote. Stellar job dad.

5. This teeny tiny crab eating a strawberry is just too adorable.

I never thought I'd describe a crab as adorable, and yet here we are. I mean, goodness. Wook at its widdle tiny cwawwwws! Those have to be the tiniest bites of strawberry that have ever been consumed.

6. This young Corn King won everyone's hearts with his corntastic personality.

I've watched this video at least a dozen times. "Whaaat?! It's just a pun about cowhn!" It's too much. Read the story here.

7. Apparently, it's the 8th anniversary of one of the greatest viral videos the world has ever seen.

Five-year-old Noah Ritter (aka "the 'apparently' kid") gave us such a laugh that even the Newswatch 16 reporter couldn't keep it together. Eight years, and it still never gets old.

8. Duncan the doggo is torn between responding to his owner and keeping his eyes on the neighborhood. (SOUND UP)

Goodness knows he was trying hard to be a good boy. Hilarious.

9. Housekeepers going above and beyond in their cleaning duties are the bestest.

Scroll through to see what hilarity these other cleaners concocted. Love seeing people take pride in their work and take the time to make strangers smile.

10. When the water's colder than you anticipated but you're trying to be cool…

Ha ha. NOPE.

Hope that brought a smile or ten to your face! Come back next week for another roundup of 10 things that made us smile. (And in the meantime, sign up for The Upworthiest newsletter to get the best stuff right to your inbox.)

All images provided by Adewole Adamson

It begins with more inclusive conversations at a patient level

True

Adewole Adamson, MD, of the University of Texas, Austin, aims to create more equity in health care by gathering data from more diverse populations by using artificial intelligence (AI), a type of machine learning. Dr. Adamson’s work is funded by the American Cancer Society (ACS), an organization committed to advancing health equity through research priorities, programs and services for groups who have been marginalized.

Melanoma became a particular focus for Dr. Adamson after meeting Avery Smith, who lost his wife—a Black woman—to the deadly disease.

melanoma,  melanoma for dark skin Avery Smith (left) and Adamson (sidenote)

This personal encounter, coupled with multiple conversations with Black dermatology patients, drove Dr. Adamson to a concerning discovery: as advanced as AI is at detecting possible skin cancers, it is heavily biased.

To understand this bias, it helps to first know how AI works in the early detection of skin cancer, which Dr. Adamson explains in his paper for the New England Journal of Medicine (paywall). The process uses computers that rely on sets of accumulated data to learn what healthy or unhealthy skin looks like and then create an algorithm to predict diagnoses based on those data sets.

This process, known as supervised learning, could lead to huge benefits in preventive care.

After all, early detection is key to better outcomes. The problem is that the data sets don’t include enough information about darker skin tones. As Adamson put it, “everything is viewed through a ‘white lens.’”

“If you don’t teach the algorithm with a diverse set of images, then that algorithm won’t work out in the public that is diverse,” writes Adamson in a study he co-wrote with Smith (according to a story in The Atlantic). “So there’s risk, then, for people with skin of color to fall through the cracks.”

Tragically, Smith’s wife was diagnosed with melanoma too late and paid the ultimate price for it. And she was not an anomaly—though the disease is more common for White patients, Black cancer patients are far more likely to be diagnosed at later stages, causing a notable disparity in survival rates between non-Hispanics whites (90%) and non-Hispanic blacks (66%).

As a computer scientist, Smith suspected this racial bias and reached out to Adamson, hoping a Black dermatologist would have more diverse data sets. Though Adamson didn’t have what Smith was initially looking for, this realization ignited a personal mission to investigate and reduce disparities.

Now, Adamson uses the knowledge gained through his years of research to help advance the fight for health equity. To him, that means not only gaining a wider array of data sets, but also having more conversations with patients to understand how socioeconomic status impacts the level and efficiency of care.

“At the end of the day, what matters most is how we help patients at the patient level,” Adamson told Upworthy. “And how can you do that without knowing exactly what barriers they face?”

american cancer society, skin cacner treatment"What matters most is how we help patients at the patient level."https://www.kellydavidsonstudio.com/

The American Cancer Society believes everyone deserves a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer—regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, gender identity, their disability status, or where they live. Inclusive tools and resources on the Health Equity section of their website can be found here. For more information about skin cancer, visit cancer.org/skincancer.

Woman's experience reminds everyone to lock hotel door.

If you've ever stayed in a hotel, you know there's an additional lock you can latch as an added layer of protection. But sometimes weird things happen that make us rethink the comfort and security many of us take for granted. TikTok user TayBeepBoop had a disturbing experience when a hotel front desk person attempted to enter her room while she was inside. Some readers may find the story to be unsettling but it's a powerful reminder of exactly why situational awareness and caution are so important in today's world.

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via TikTok

This article originally appeared on 01.27.21


Menstrual taboos are as old as time and found across cultures. They've been used to separate women from men physically — menstrual huts are still a thing — and socially, by creating the perception that a natural bodily function is a sign of weakness.

Even in today's world women are deemed unfit for positions of power because some men actually believe they won't be able to handle stressful situations while mensurating.

"Menstruation is an opening for attack: a mark of shame, a sign of weakness, an argument to keep women out of positions of power,' Colin Schultz writes in Popular Science.

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via Pexels

A teacher lists his class rules.

This article originally appeared on 03.17.22


The world would be a much better place if humans weren’t so … human. We all fall short of perfection. Common sense is, sadly, not too common. And there’s one guy out there who always manages to screw things up when things start getting good.

Call it Murphy’s law. Call it the great “reason we can’t have nice things.” Call it entropy. It feels like a whole lot of pain could be avoided if we all had just a little bit more sense.

But what if there was one rule that we all agreed to follow to make everyone’s life better? What would this magical rule be?

A Reddit user who goes by the name P4insplatter came to this realization and asked the AskReddit subforum, “What simple rule would fix the world if everyone actually followed it?” They received dozens of simple rules that if everyone got behind would make the world drastically better.

It’s no shock that most of them felt like a variation of the Golden Rule. It’s funny that a lot of folks believe the world would seriously improve if we could just abide by a simple saying that we all learned in kindergarten.

Also known as the “ethics of reciprocity,” the Golden Rule is so innate to humans that versions of it have been found in religions and cultures throughout the world.

Here are 17 of the best responses to P4insplatter’s simple, but world-altering question.

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