'Your Korean Dad' Nick Cho is like a modern day Mr. Rogers, but for grown-ups

In an time when social media often feels like a cesspool of hot political takes, rampant misinformation, and insufferable narcissism, a glowing example of goodness truly stands out.

Enter Nick Cho, aka "Your Korean dad," whose wholesome TikTok videos are captivating people and capturing hearts, right when we need good things the most. Cho, whose day job is CEO and co-founder of Wrecking Ball Coffee, has been using his TikTok account to be a doting, supportive Korean dad to anyone who could use one. At first, it's like "Okay, maybe that's kind of cute," but the more you watch, the more endearing it becomes.

People have compared Cho to Mr. Rogers, which is just about the highest praise anyone can receive on this earth, but it's not hard to see after watching a handful of his videos. What could seem super schticky feels surprisingly sincere, as Cho offers fatherly advice and encouragement in ways that people might not even realize they need.


From the signature pat on the head through the camera, to the food that he sets in front of you, to the sage words of wisdom he offers in his upbeat, gentle way...oof. If you are missing a dad figure in your life, he's got you covered. And even if you have a great dad who is active in your life, you can still appreciate what Cho is doing here.

Watch the montage Now This made to see him in action.

Cho has racked up 1.5 million followers on TikTok, and it's not hard to see why.

People on TikTok and Twitter comment that Cho's videos make them feel safe and cared about. For some people, the wholesomeness of it all is just heartwarming, but for others, there's a genuine hole that Cho seems to be filling. There are a lot of people who didn't grow up with a loving, kind, supportive father and seeing examples of what a dad can be evokes both pain and hope.

And seriously with the Mr. Rogers references, right?


Tears have been an unexpected phenomenon for a lot of people watching Cho. Like, how can I possibly be tearing up over this? It's so simple and silly, and yet so sweet and loving and wholesome, and oh yep, here come the tears.

We are all so desperate for examples of pure goodness right now, and Nick Cho—our Korean dad—is providing just that.

I mean, look at the way he talks about respecting the intention of the designer of the newest Air Jordan shoe. Not something I would expect to care about AT ALL, but I'll be darned if I'm not picking up what Korean dad is laying down here.


"Thanks for letting me take part in your creation." Dang. Amazing.

Thanks, Korean dad. Please don't leave us.

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