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This model wants to redefine what 'normal' looks like on fitness magazines.

Nadia Aboulhosn is helping redefine what 'healthy' looks like.

This model wants to redefine what 'normal' looks like on fitness magazines.

This is Nadia Aboulhosn.

And if I were you, I'd remember that name.


The model, blogger, and "rule-breaker" is the latest cover girl on Women's Running magazine.

And, as the outlet noted, the Los Angeles-based social media star is truly "a force of nature."



You don't see Aboulhosn's body size or shape too often on or in fitness magazines, which is unfortunate, to say the least.

Even though she may have more curves than the stereotypical fitness models' chiseled abs of steel, Aboulhosn is in pretty great shape, and she has been for awhile.

Take, for instance, the fact that she was the only girl on her high school's football team and that she could "bench press a crazy amount."

“The coach liked to joke with the guys when I would beat them in practice," Aboulhosn, who now stays in shape by running and circuit training, told the magazine.

If Aboulhosn is in great shape (so much so that she's circuit training and out-lifting the guys), why aren't more women with bodies like hers also gracing the covers of fitness magazines?

Aboulhosn's cover isn't just unique. It's helping redefine what "healthy" looks like.

Because, as many experts will tell you, you shouldn't judge a book by its cover when it comes to clothing size and physical health. Fat people can be in great shape and incredibly healthy, just like skinny people can be in poor shape or unhealthy. To assume that one body type is more or less healthy than others just by looking at them is absurd. Not to mention, health means different things to different people: What's healthy for one person may not be healthy for another.

Health and fitness mags should take note of this — as they're often the ones perpetuating these body stereotypes.

Photo via iStock.

Author and health researcher Linda Bacon, Ph.D., spoke with Upworthy in January about the widespread fallacy that connects body size and health.

"To paraphrase a now famous comment from my friend and rock star Marilyn Wann, 'the only thing you can diagnose about a fat person is your own level of prejudice,'" Bacon told Upworthy. "Even the heavily entrenched idea that heavier people eat more than thinner people isn’t supported by data."

That's why the April cover of Women's Running magazine matters.

Aboulhosn hopes her cover can be part of a larger conversation on body positivity and what it means to be "normal."

“I’m just trying to normalize what should have already been seen as normal," Aboulhosn told BuzzFeed, noting she doesn't use the term "plus-size" to describe herself because it contributes to the idea that one particular body size is the standard and anything other than that isn't ideal.


“Even if it’s making people feel uncomfortable right now," she said of her cover, "I hope [readers] take away that [body type diversity] is what normal is going to be eventually.”

Becoming a cover model? Cool. Changing the conversation about health and body positivity? Way cooler.

Bravo, Nadia.

Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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"Will there be a list of everybody who decided to do this to us and our park, in case we want to vote them out?"

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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