Depression can make it difficult to do everyday tasks, like taking care of oneself or even getting out of bed, as these before and after photos of one woman show.

Kate Langman, a stylist at Ulta Beauty, first saw her future client in the hair care aisle of Ulta, pulling bottles of "All Soft" Redken hair products off the shelf. Langman asked the woman if she needed help, to which she replied she was looking for something to fix her hair. According to Langman, the woman said she had been unable to get out of bed for six months due to depression. During that time, she pulled her hair into a bun, which after months of being neglected, had matted into a "huge dreadlock."

Langman told the woman to put the haircare products back and come in for an appointment instead. The two scheduled an appointment for the next day, but the woman canceled, making an appointment for two weeks later instead. Two week later, and the woman canceled again. At this point Langman assumed she would never see the woman again.


Then, on March 9, the woman came into Ulta and asked Langman if she could do her hair that very same day, noting that she was finally able to get out of bed again.

Eight-and-a-half-hours later and Langman turned the woman’s hair into a style deserving of her strength. "I didn’t care how late I stayed, I wanted to make sure she got taken care of," Langman wrote on a post she shared to Facebook with her client’s permission. "Most of the time the advice is to just cut it off… But I wanted to make this work for her."

More than 30,000 people have shared Langman's post since she first shared it. "I didn’t share the post because of the transformation. I did it because I wanted people to see that depression is a real serious thing," Langman told The Mighty. "And just by simply saying 'I'll help you' can change their outlook on life, so much. The hair was an added bonus to making her feel happy again."

Most of us don't think of a bird as a cuddly pet, but Swoop the snuggly magpie didn't care what humans think. After he was rescued by New Zealander Matt Owens, the baby bird became a beloved part of the family—the family being Owens and his cat, Mowgli.

"It was just sitting there bleeding, sort of unable to walk properly and it looked like it had been abandoned by its mum so I just picked it up and decided to take it home," Owens told Newshub. The timing of finding Swoop couldn't have been better. Owens' dad had just been diagnosed with terminal cancer, and the bond he formed taking care of Swoop gave Owens an extra dose of love and comfort.

Mowgli wasn't sure about the new family member at first, but soon took to Swoop and the two became fur-feather friends. The Dodo recently shared a video on Facebook highlighting Owens, Swoop, and Mowgli's story, and it's unbelievably adorable.

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It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

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Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

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Bill Gates has always been passionate about providing vaccines to the parts of the world that lack resources. On Friday he came through again by announcing that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is committing $150 million toward efforts to develop and distribute a low cost COVID-19 vaccine to some of the poorer countries of the world.

According to Vox, this latest financial commitment brings the total Gates has dedicated to the pandemic to around $500 million. He is hoping the funds will keep vaccine costs down to increase accessibility beyond just the wealthier populations. As Gates told Bloomberg, "We're trying to make sure we can end it not just in the rich countries." Gates is working with the Serum Institute, which is the most prolific vaccine producer in the world, to make $100 million doses that would not exceed $3. In general, companies producing the vaccine have agreed to keep the profit margin low."


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