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Pregnant woman swaps her baby shower for a 'nesting party' and people are taking note

"Every pregnant mom needs a nesting party."

nesting party, baby shower, nia lui

Women clean Nia Lui's house at her nesting party.

A mother expecting her 3rd child decided to forget about having a baby shower and brought her friends together for something she needed even more: a nesting party. Instead of spending an afternoon watching her friends drink champagne and play games, Nia Lui put them to work to prepare her home for her new arrival.

Lui documented the event on TikTok, and after seeing the video, a lot of women said they’d much rather go to a nesting party than a baby shower.

The special day came courtesy of Lui’s friend, Bree. Lui gave her a list of everything she needed to do around the house before her daughter arrived and the women gave her home a deep cleaning, organized the kitchen and got the baby’s room together.


"Every pregnant mom needs a nesting party. If you’re pregnant and don’t want a baby shower, do this,” Lui captioned the video.

If you’re pregnant and don’t want a baby shower, do this. If you have a pregnant friend, do this for them! 

@nialui21

Replying to @Haley Sheppard Every pregnant mom needs a nesting party. If you’re pregnant and don’t want a baby shower, do this. If you have a pregnant friend, do this for them! #nestingparty #nestingmom #nestingmode #pregnantmom #pregnancy #babyshower #nestingmama #thirdtrimester #ittakesavillage #myvillage @Bri Welcker

In the post, Lui explained how the event came together. "So I had my nesting party last night instead of a baby shower and it was amazing,” she said. "My friend Bree organized it. I sent her a list of things that I wanted to get done before the baby came, and she made little cards for each person to take to take on a section of the house."

"I kind of took on more of a supervisory role, kind of telling people where I wanted things and what I wanted to do with things,” she added.

Even though it was a work day, the friends still took some time to enjoy each other's company. "We took a dinner break, ate some soup, some sourdough bread and treats, and just chatted about this baby and how it's going to be," Lui said.


Lui explained a big reason for the nesting party in a follow-up video. "I don't like baby showers. I don't like being the center of attention," she said. "I don't like playing dumb games. I just don't. I don't. And this is our third baby. So we have everything. We basically don't need a lot besides diapers and wipes."

@nialui21

Replying to @katiecusic Nesting party answers. #nestingparty #babyshower #nesting #nestingmom #womensupportingwomen #momlife #sahm #pregnantmom #nestingmode #nestingmama #thirdtrimester #pregnancy #ittakesavillage #bethevillage #greenscreen

In the end, after her friend’s help, Lui and her family were better prepared for the new arrival. "Everything was so clean and organized," she said. "I feel so much more ready for this baby."

The video was a hit with women on TikTok, too. Many of the most popular commenters noted that they would prefer to go to a nesting party than a baby shower. “Honestly, I’d prefer doing this to sitting for three hours watching someone open presents,” one user wrote. “I refuse to go to baby showers, but I would show up early for a nesting party," Dog Momma added.

Others thought that nesting parties were more helpful than bridal showers as well.

“This is a true village, and I love everything about it,” kTaylorFitness commented. “I’m sorry, but how has this not been a thing FOREVER? I would absolutely go help alllll my pregnant friends. And wish I could have had one,” Ashleigh wrote.

In American culture, many of our celebrations revolve around buying people gifts for their graduations, weddings, or new arrivals. But sometimes, what people really need can’t be purchased in a store. Lui and her friends did the world a service by showing them that sometimes, instead of giving someone a gift, what they really need is a hand.

Photo by Eliott Reyna on Unsplash

Gen Z is navigating a career landscape unlike any other.

True

Every adult generation has its version of a “kids these days” lament, labeling the up-and-coming generation as less resilient or hardworking compared to their own youth. But Gen Z—currently middle school age through young adulthood—is challenging that notion with their career readiness.

Take Abigail Sanders, an 18-year-old college graduate. Thanks to a dual enrollment program with her online school, she actually earned her bachelor’s degree before her high school diploma. Now she’s in medical school at Bastyr University in Washington state, on track to become a doctor by age 22.

a family of 6 at a graduation with two graduatesAll four of the Sanders kids have utilized Connections Academy to prepare for their futures.

Abigail’s twin sister, Chloe, also did dual enrollment in high school to earn her associate’s in business and is on an early college graduation path to become a vet tech.

Maeson Frymire dreams of becoming a paramedic. He got his EMT certification in high school and fought fires in New Mexico after graduation. Now he’s working towards becoming an advanced certified EMT and has carved his career path towards flight paramedicine.

Sidny Szybnski spends her summers helping run her family’s log cabin resort on Priest Lake in Idaho. She's taken business and finance courses in high school and hopes to be the third generation to run the resort after attending college.

log cabin resort on edge of forestAfter college, Sidny Szybnski hopes to run her family's resort in Priest Lake, Idaho.

Each of these learners has attended Connections Academy, tuition-free online public schools available in 29 states across the U.S., to not only get ready for college but to dive straight into college coursework and get a head start on career training as well. These students are prime examples of how Gen Zers are navigating the career prep landscape, finding their passions, figuring out their paths and making sure they’re prepared for an ever-changing job market.

Lorna Bryant, the Head of Career Education for Connections Academy’s online school program, says that Gen Z has access to a vast array of career-prep tools that previous generations didn’t have, largely thanks to the internet.

“Twenty to 30 years ago, young people largely relied on what adults told them about careers and how to get there,” Bryant tells Upworthy. “Today, teens have a lot more agency. With technology and social media, they have access to so much information about jobs, employers and training. With a tap on their phones, they can hear directly from people who are in the jobs they may be interested in. Corporate websites and social media accounts outline an organization’s mission, vision and values—which are especially important for Gen Z.”

Research shows over 75% of high schoolers want to focus on skills that will prepare them for in-demand jobs. However, not all teens know what the options are or where to find them. Having your future wide open can be overwhelming, and young people might be afraid of making a wrong choice that will impact their whole lives.

Bryant emphasizes that optimism and enthusiasm from parents can help a lot, in addition to communicating that nothing's carved in stone—kids can change paths if they find themselves on one that isn’t a good fit.

Dr. Bryant and student video meeting Dr. Bryant meeting with a student

“I think the most important thing to communicate to teens is that they have more options than ever to pursue a career,” she says. “A two- or four-year college continues to be an incredibly valuable and popular route, but the pathways to a rewarding career have changed so much in the past decade. Today, career planning conversations include options like taking college credit while still in high school or earning a career credential or certificate before high school graduation. There are other options like the ‘ships’—internships, mentorships, apprenticeships—that can connect teens to college, careers, and employers who may offer on-the-job training or even pay for employees to go to college.”

Parents can also help kids develop “durable skills”—sometimes called “soft” or “human” skills—such as communication, leadership, collaboration, empathy and grit. Bryant says durable skills are incredibly valuable because they are attractive to employers and colleges and transfer across industries and jobs. A worldwide Pearson survey found that those skills are some of the most sought after by employers.

“The good news is that teens are likely to be already developing these skills,” says Bryant. Volunteering, having a part-time job, joining or captaining a team sport can build durable skills in a way that can also be highlighted on college and job applications.

Young people are navigating a fast-changing world, and the qualities, skills and tools they need to succeed may not always be familiar to their parents and grandparents. But Gen Z is showing that when they have a good grasp of the options and opportunities, they’re ready to embark on their career paths, wherever they may lead.

Learn more about Connections Academy here and Connections’ new college and career prep initiative here.

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