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Man's eye-opening story about taking 'a black walk' in a white neighborhood goes viral

This article originally appeared on 03.02.20


Though we're all part of the same species living on the same planet, our experience as humans walking through this world can differ widely. Children see things through a different lens than adults. Women and men have different perspectives on certain issues. And because racism has long been an active element in our society, people with varying amounts of melanin in their skin face specific challenges that others don't.


As a white American, I don't instinctively know what it's like to walk in a black person's shoes. I can tell you about the legacy of white supremacy laced throughout our country's history. I can explain the far-reaching effects of slavery, lynch mobs, Jim Crow laws, redlining, mass incarceration, and more. I can intellectually break down the psychological and sociological impact of centuries of race-based oppression.

But I can't tell you what it feels like to walk through this world, right now, as a black person—which is why it's so important to listen to the voices of people who can.

David Summers shared a story on Facebook that reflects the experience of many black Americans—one that can help us non-black folks see through a lens we simply do not and cannot have. Perhaps that's why it's been shared more than 20,000 times. From the fear that any object he carries might be mistaken as a gun to figuring out how to smile at a stranger just right so he won't be considered a threat, the "black thoughts" Summers describes during his walk through a beautiful, white neighborhood—presumably a neighborhood most of us would consider "safe"—are heartbreaking.

He wrote:

"I took a black walk this morning. I took a black walk through a white neighborhood. When I take black walks, I think black thoughts. I am conscious of where I've placed my gun, my gun, and my gun. I mean, my phone, my wallet, and my keys. Because Peace Officers have a hard time telling the difference. I rehearse what I'll say if a concerned resident, or a law enforcement employee has questions about why my black body is walking through their white space. And I remind myself to make sure the law enforcement employee has his body camera recording. Sometimes it helps if there is video evidence to accompany the hashtag.

There is no way to be stealthy when you take a black walk. White neighborhoods are blanketed by a sophisticated security system comprised of nosy neighbors, Ring doorbell cameras, and white women walking their dogs. So, I've learned to notice the white world through my periphery. To be aware of the dangers without acknowledging them. There is an art to making white people feel safe. To say 'Good Morning' and flash a smile that shows confidence and deference at the same time. To being polite because your life depends on it.

I felt the squad car behind me before I saw it.

It moved deliberately. Not like the other cars mindlessly whizzing past. Its tires inched. Crept. Stalked their way toward me.

I kept walking.

"Don't take your hands out of your pockets," I thought. Or wait, maybe I should? Maybe it's better if my hands are clearly empty. But it's cold outside…maybe it's nothing. Keep walking.

The car rolled past me and made a slow right turn. I glanced quickly but didn't stare. The air is still. My ears tuned out everything but the slight scuff of my sneakers on the sidewalk and the fading sound of those stalking tires.

Almost there.

Suddenly the squad car re-emerged. It was a block ahead of me. It made a quick right turn, continued to the end of the street, and then waited. No more stalking. This was a show of force. This was a roar. This was a reminder that I was trespassing.

I kept walking.

"Don't take your hands out of your pockets," I thought. Or wait, maybe I should? Maybe it's better if my hands are clearly empty. But it's cold outside…maybe it's nothing. Keep walking.

The car rolled past me and made a slow right turn. I glanced quickly but didn't stare. The air is still. My ears tuned out everything but the slight scuff of my sneakers on the sidewalk and the fading sound of those stalking tires.

Almost there.

Suddenly the squad car re-emerged. It was a block ahead of me. It made a quick right turn, continued to the end of the street, and then waited. No more stalking. This was a show of force. This was a roar. This was a reminder that I was trespassing.

I kept walking.

As I approached the corner, the front window began to roll down. The occupant didn't speak. Didn't smile. Just stared. I was being warned.

I crossed the street and the lion trotted off. He had effectively marked his territory. The brave protector had done his job.

I however, couldn't help but wonder what I'd missed during my black walk. It's hard to hear the birds chirping, or to smile at the squirrels playfully darting along the branches when you're on a black walk. It's easy to miss the promise of a light blue sky, or appreciate the audacity of the red, yellow, and purple daisies declaring their independence from the green grass when your mind is preoccupied with black thoughts.

I took a walk through a beautiful neighborhood this morning. But I missed the whole thing."

Thank you, Mr. Summers, for sharing your "black walk" experience. Hopefully, it will prompt us all to ask ourselves whether our words and actions serve to reinforce or remedy what you've described.

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

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Science

Ethical, lab-grown diamonds are good for your wallet and even better for the planet

They’re identical to traditional diamonds but without the negative environmental and societal impacts of mining.



Image via Unsplash


When you think of diamonds, what comes to mind? For many, the jewels are a sign of opulence and wealth. For others, diamonds are a symbol of love and commitment. But for those who are worried about the planet, diamonds can represent something far more sinister: exploitation and environmental degradation.

Diamond mining, especially in Africa, causes soil erosion, deforestation, and overall ecosystem destruction. And that doesn’t even factor in the human toll. Although the industry has taken steps to improve the situation, African diamond mines are notorious for their low wages and poor working conditions. But despite the negative publicity, global diamond jewelry sales are now worth more than $72 billion annually.

Clearly, the public has a strong cultural attachment to these beautiful jewels. But what if there was a way to satisfy this massive demand without exploiting the poorest of the poor. What if there was a way to create diamonds from scratch without the need for destructive mining practices. Well, as it turns out, there is.

The Benefits Of Lab-Grown Diamonds

Image via Unsplash

In recent years, scientists have created diamonds in the lab that are the same quality as those you would find in a mine. Since these lab-grown diamonds are composed of crystallized carbon, they are virtually identical to traditional diamonds. Only advanced testing equipment can tell the difference. At the end of the day, lab-grown diamonds look like real diamonds because they are real diamonds.

Because these diamonds are created in a lab, the issues of low wages and worker exploitation are virtually nonexistent. And in terms of environmental damage, there’s no comparison between diamond mines and diamond labs. However, lab-grown diamonds still require a large amount of energy to create, so it’s not as if they are carbon neutral. But according to Saleem Ali, a minerals expert at the University of Delaware who was interviewed by The Guardian, “the environmental impact is far greater for mined diamonds” when the entire life cycle of a diamond mine is considered.

Better For The Planet, And Better For Your Wallet

Image via Unsplash


Aside from the fact that lab-grown diamonds are less exploitive and better for the planet, it turns out that they’re also better for your bottom line. That’s because it's cheaper and less time-consuming to create diamonds in a lab than it is to locate and excavate them. And a company called SuperJeweler is passing these savings on to consumers.

Since 1999, SuperJeweler has offered diamonds from ethical, conflict-free suppliers directly to the public. And now, the company is selling lab-grown diamonds, including 1 and 2-carat diamond earrings in solid 14k gold. So if you’re on the market for beautiful diamond jewelry, why wouldn’t you pay less for the same product and help protect the environment in the process? Click here to learn more about these beautiful lab-grown diamonds today.

Bobby McFerrin demonstrated the power of the pentatonic scale without saying a word.

Bobby McFerrin is best known for his hit song “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” which showcased his one-man vocal and body percussion skills (and got stuck in our heads for years). But his musicality extends far beyond the catchy pop tune that made him a household name. The things he can do with his voice are unmatched and his range of musical styles and genres is impressive.

The Kennedy Center describes him: “With a four-octave range and a vast array of vocal techniques, Bobby McFerrin is no mere singer; he is music's last true Renaissance man, a vocal explorer who has combined jazz, folk and a multitude of world music influences - choral, a cappella, and classical music - with his own ingredients.”

McFerrin is also a music educator, and one of his most memorable lessons is a simple, three-minute interactive demonstration in which he doesn’t say a single word.

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