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NSYNC's Joey Fatone advocates for men being candid about cosmetic changes

"A lot of men are very shy or embarrassed about it, but there's nothing to be embarrassed about!"

joey fatone, joey fatone plastic surgery, joey fatone cosmetic procedures, people mag
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NSYNC member Joey Fatone opened up about his previous cosmetic procedures

While many people (especially those of younger generations) have no issue being candid about their cosmetic work, that transparency, generally speaking, seems to come mostly from women.

And that’s not because there’s no demand. Whether for career prospects or a more fruitful dating life or simply to get rid of pesky annoyances, procedures for men are on the rise. Primarily eyelid rejuvenation, neck lifts, rhinoplasty (nose jobs), chin augmentation, liposuction, breast reduction and a general assortment of botox and fillers, according to the North Shore Plastic Surgeon blog.

And yet, you’d be hard pressed to find many men talking about these procedures. Perhaps because whatever stigma surrounding plastic surgery that remains—associating it with superficiality, vanity, low self esteem—also touches on the stigma still surrounding masculinity.


On that point, perhaps some still fear that it isn’t “manly” to give that much energy, time or money towards something like enhancing one’s appearance. Or maybe being open about getting work done equals admitting weakness. There are probably multiple factors involved.

Recently, NSYNC singer Joey Fatone got candid about his own body modifications in an attempt to encourage men to not be ashamed of getting their own enhancements.

"Many guys get work done,” he said in an exclusive interview with People, "They don't broadcast it because a lot of men are very shy or embarrassed about it, but there's nothing to be embarrassed about!"

Fatone, who removed fat from his chin and stomach using Airsculpt and got hair plugs, attested that he wasn’t attempting to turn back the clock or dramatically alter his look, but just feel a bit more comfortable.

"I'm not trying to change who I am. I'm just trying to just edit it a little bit!" he said, telling People that he grew tired of wearing a spray to fill in his thinning hairline for television appearances, and that he had some stubborn fat despite diet and exercise.

"I've had some people say 'You can't get a certain job if you're not a certain weight.' But I'll find a way to get those jobs. There's plenty of room for everybody in every field,” he continued. “Plus, aging just happens. We all age in some shape or form!" Ultimately, his outlook seems pretty even keeled.

While speaking to Us Weekly, Fatone shared his hope that men will one day be as open about their treatments as women are.

“So many women are very vocal about their procedures and things that they do. Why not men? What is the big deal?” he asked.

While it may be true that women are more vocal about their procedures than men are, stigma for both sexes remains. From consistent tabloids “exposing” celebrity enhancements to articles touting the superiority of aging naturally, cosmetic alterations still seem to be perceived as a moral failing, rather than a personal choice.

And yet, multiple studies show how plastic surgery really can dramatically help a person’s mental health, not just their appearance. New York City plastic surgeon Dr. Adam Kolker notes the evidence reveals that, contrary to popular opinion, "these procedures are proven to have a very, very deep impact on the individual's life," resulting in "a dramatic increase in self-perception, self-confidence, and sexual wellbeing."
plastic surgery, cosmetic procedure, plastic surgery for men, botox, fillers

Studies show that plastic surgery can benefit wellbeing.

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As more people openly share their experience, perhaps we will get a more well-rounded viewpoint on the subject. After all—multiple truths can exist at once. A person can have a healthy outlook towards themselves and towards growing older, but still would feel better altering how they look. We can have unrealistic beauty standards, and still acknowledging that it’s completely natural for both men and women to go towards things that might make them feel better.

By opening up the discussion for nuance, people are ultimately able to make more thoughtful choices. And sometimes having all the information is the only difference between a right choice and a wrong one.

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From political science to joining the fight against cancer: How one woman found her passion

An unexpected pivot to project management expanded Krystal Brady's idea of what it means to make a positive impact.

Krystal Brady/PMI

Krystal Brady utilizes her project management skills to help advance cancer research and advocacy.

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Cancer impacts nearly everyone’s life in one way or another, and thankfully, we’re learning more about treatment and prevention every day. Individuals and organizations dedicated to fighting cancer and promising research from scientists are often front and center, but we don’t always see the people working behind the scenes to make the fight possible.

People like Krystal Brady.

While studying political science in college, Brady envisioned her future self in public office. She never dreamed she’d build a successful career in the world of oncology, helping cancer researchers, doctors and advocates continue battling cancer, but more efficiently.

Brady’s journey to oncology began with a seasonal job at a small publishing company, which helped pay for college and awakened her love for managing projects. Now, 15 years later, she’s serving as director of digital experience and strategy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which she describes as “the perfect place to pair my love of project management and desire to make positive change in the world.”

As a project manager, Brady helps make big ideas for the improvement of diagnosing and treating cancer a reality. She is responsible for driving the critical projects that impact the lives of cancer researchers, doctors, and patients.

“I tell people that my job is part toolbox, part glue,” says Brady. “Being a project manager means being responsible for understanding the details of a project, knowing what tools or resources you need to execute the project, and facilitating the flow of that work to the best outcome possible. That means promoting communication, partnership, and ownership among the team for the project.”

At its heart, Brady’s project management work is about helping people. One of the big projects Brady is currently working on is ASCO’s digital transformation, which includes upgrading systems and applications to help streamline and personalize oncologists’ online experience so they can access the right resources more quickly. Whether you are managing humans or machines, there’s an extraordinary need for workers with the skillset to harness new technology and solve problems.

The digital transformation project also includes preparing for the use of emerging technologies such as generative AI to help them in their research and practices.

“Most importantly, it lays the groundwork for us to make a meaningful impact at the point of care, giving the oncologist and patient the absolute latest recommendations or guidelines for care for that specific patient or case, allowing the doctor to spend more time with their patients and less time on paperwork,” Brady says.

In today’s fast-changing, quickly advancing world, project management is perhaps more valuable than ever. After discovering her love for it, Brady earned her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification through Project Management Institute (PMI)—the premier professional organization for project managers with chapters all over the world—which she says gave her an edge over other candidates when she applied for her job at ASCO.

“The knowledge I gained in preparing for the PMP exam serves me every day in my role,” Brady says. “What I did not expect and have truly come to value is the PMI network as well – finding like-minded individuals, opportunities for continuous learning, and the ability to volunteer and give back.”

PMI’s growing community – including more than 300 chapters globally – serves as a place for project managers and individuals who use project management skills to learn and grow through events, online resources, and certification programs.

While people often think of project management in the context of corporate careers, all industries and organizations need project managers, making it a great career for those who want to elevate our world through non-profits or other service-oriented fields.

“Project management makes a difference by focusing on efficiency and outcomes, making us all a little better at what we do,” says Brady. “In almost every industry, understanding how to do our work more effectively and efficiently means more value to our customers, and the world at large, at an increased pace.”

Project management is also a stable career path in high demand as shown by PMI research, which found that the global economy will need 25 million more project managers by 2030 and that the median salary for project managers in the US has grown to $120K.

If you’d like to learn more about careers in project management, PMI has resources to help you get started or prove your proficiency, including its entry-level Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification program. For those interested in pursuing a project management career to make a difference, it could be your first step.
via Taylor Skaff/Unsplash and Kenny Eliason/Unsplash

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