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NSYNC's Joey Fatone advocates for men being candid about cosmetic changes

"A lot of men are very shy or embarrassed about it, but there's nothing to be embarrassed about!"

joey fatone, joey fatone plastic surgery, joey fatone cosmetic procedures, people mag
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NSYNC member Joey Fatone opened up about his previous cosmetic procedures

While many people (especially those of younger generations) have no issue being candid about their cosmetic work, that transparency, generally speaking, seems to come mostly from women.

And that’s not because there’s no demand. Whether for career prospects or a more fruitful dating life or simply to get rid of pesky annoyances, procedures for men are on the rise. Primarily eyelid rejuvenation, neck lifts, rhinoplasty (nose jobs), chin augmentation, liposuction, breast reduction and a general assortment of botox and fillers, according to the North Shore Plastic Surgeon blog.

And yet, you’d be hard pressed to find many men talking about these procedures. Perhaps because whatever stigma surrounding plastic surgery that remains—associating it with superficiality, vanity, low self esteem—also touches on the stigma still surrounding masculinity.


On that point, perhaps some still fear that it isn’t “manly” to give that much energy, time or money towards something like enhancing one’s appearance. Or maybe being open about getting work done equals admitting weakness. There are probably multiple factors involved.

Recently, NSYNC singer Joey Fatone got candid about his own body modifications in an attempt to encourage men to not be ashamed of getting their own enhancements.

"Many guys get work done,” he said in an exclusive interview with People, "They don't broadcast it because a lot of men are very shy or embarrassed about it, but there's nothing to be embarrassed about!"

Fatone, who removed fat from his chin and stomach using Airsculpt and got hair plugs, attested that he wasn’t attempting to turn back the clock or dramatically alter his look, but just feel a bit more comfortable.

"I'm not trying to change who I am. I'm just trying to just edit it a little bit!" he said, telling People that he grew tired of wearing a spray to fill in his thinning hairline for television appearances, and that he had some stubborn fat despite diet and exercise.

"I've had some people say 'You can't get a certain job if you're not a certain weight.' But I'll find a way to get those jobs. There's plenty of room for everybody in every field,” he continued. “Plus, aging just happens. We all age in some shape or form!" Ultimately, his outlook seems pretty even keeled.

While speaking to Us Weekly, Fatone shared his hope that men will one day be as open about their treatments as women are.

“So many women are very vocal about their procedures and things that they do. Why not men? What is the big deal?” he asked.

While it may be true that women are more vocal about their procedures than men are, stigma for both sexes remains. From consistent tabloids “exposing” celebrity enhancements to articles touting the superiority of aging naturally, cosmetic alterations still seem to be perceived as a moral failing, rather than a personal choice.

And yet, multiple studies show how plastic surgery really can dramatically help a person’s mental health, not just their appearance. New York City plastic surgeon Dr. Adam Kolker notes the evidence reveals that, contrary to popular opinion, "these procedures are proven to have a very, very deep impact on the individual's life," resulting in "a dramatic increase in self-perception, self-confidence, and sexual wellbeing."
plastic surgery, cosmetic procedure, plastic surgery for men, botox, fillers

Studies show that plastic surgery can benefit wellbeing.

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As more people openly share their experience, perhaps we will get a more well-rounded viewpoint on the subject. After all—multiple truths can exist at once. A person can have a healthy outlook towards themselves and towards growing older, but still would feel better altering how they look. We can have unrealistic beauty standards, and still acknowledging that it’s completely natural for both men and women to go towards things that might make them feel better.

By opening up the discussion for nuance, people are ultimately able to make more thoughtful choices. And sometimes having all the information is the only difference between a right choice and a wrong one.

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Music’s biggest night took place Sunday, February 4 with the 66th Annual GRAMMY Awards. Now, fans have the opportunity to take home a piece of the famed event.

Longtime GRAMMY Awards partner Mastercard is using this year’s campaign to shine a light on the environment and the Priceless Planet Coalition (PPC), a forest restoration program with the goal of restoring 100 million trees. Music fans are 1.5 times more likely to take action to help the environment, making the GRAMMY Awards the perfect opportunity to raise awareness.

“Through our GRAMMY Awards campaign, we’ve created an opportunity for our brand, our partners and consumers to come together over shared values, to participate during a moment when we can celebrate our passion for music and our commitment to make meaningful investments to preserve the environment,” says Rustom Dastoor, Executive Vice President of Marketing and Communications, North America at Mastercard.

The campaign kicked off with an inspired self-guided multi-sensory tour at the GRAMMY House presented by Mastercard, where people journeyed through their passion of music and educational experience about Mastercard’s longstanding commitment to tree restoration. Then, this year’s most-nominated GRAMMY artist and a passionate voice for the environment, SZA, led the charge with the debut performance of her new song, Saturn.

Mastercard’s partners are also joining the mission by encouraging people all over the country to participate; Lyft and Sirius XM are both offering ways for consumers to get involved in the Priceless Planet Coalition. To learn more about how you can support these efforts, visit mastercard.com/forceofnature.

While fashion is always a highlight of any GRAMMY Awards event, SZA’s outfit worn during her performance of Saturn was designed to make a statement; made of tree seeds to help spread awareness. Fans can even comment ‘🌱’ and tag a friend on Mastercard’s designated post of SZA’s GRAMMY House performance for a chance to win a tree seed from the performance outfit*.

“SZA has a personal passion for sustainability – not just in forest restoration but in the clothes she wears and the platforms and partners she aligns herself with. It was important to us to partner with someone who is not only showing up big at the GRAMMY Awards – as the most GRAMMY-nominated artist this year – but also showing up big for the environment,” says Dastoor.

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Joy

NICU nurse adopts 14-year-old patient who delivered triplets alone

“I knew it would be impossible to find a foster home that would take all four of them. No one was going to take a teen mom and her preemie triplets.”

NICU nurse adopts teen with three babies.

Having your first baby is a scary experience. Everything is new—you've quite literally never done this before—not to mention an entire human is going to be removed from your body one way or another. Childbirth, no matter how your baby leaves your body, is not for the weak. But imagine giving birth alone to not just one baby, but three, all at the same time. Then imagine doing that feat at the age of 14.

Shariya Small experienced that scenario in a hospital in Indiana, and her nurse Katrina Mullen took note. Small's babies were premature, born at just 26 weeks, when the average gestation for triplets is 33 weeks, according to ReproductiveFacts.org. Due to their early birth, the babies, Serenitee, Samari and Sarayah, had to stay in the NICU at Community Hospital North in Indianapolis for more than five months, according to Today.com.

During their time in the NICU, Mullen noticed the young mom visited her babies alone, not appearing to have much of a support system. “She’d be there alone for days at a time sitting at her babies’ bedside,” Mullen told Today.com.

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popular

What would happen if all the Earth's ice melted?

There will be serious problems on both U.S. coasts.

What would happen if all the ice melted?

Ten percent of the land area on Earth is covered with glacial ice, which includes ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica, ice caps and glaciers. Unfortunately, 750 billion tons of Earth’s ice is melting yearly due to climate change.

If climate change isn’t stopped, this will lead to disastrous consequences for the entire planet.

"As a result of this, ice around the world is melting and raising the planet's sea level. The oceans already rose 6 centimeters during the course of the 19th century. But they rose by 19 centimeters during the 20th century, over 3 times faster than they rose in the previous century,” says a video produced by Real Life Lore. “NOAA estimates that global sea level could rise by up to 2.5 meters by the year 2100. Which would have devastating consequences."

Real Life Lore has over 7 million subscribers to its videos covering geography and world populations.

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How often do you change your sheets?

If you were to ask a random group of people, "How often do you wash your sheets?" you'd likely get drastically different answers. There are the "Every single Sunday without fail" folks, the "Who on Earth washes their sheets weekly?!?" people and everyone in between.

According to a survey of 1,000 Americans conducted by Mattress Advisor, the average time between sheet changings or washings in the U.S. is 24 days—or every 3 1/2 weeks, approximately. The same survey revealed that 35 days is the average interval at which unwashed sheets are "gross."

Some of you are cringing at those stats while others are thinking, "That sounds about right." But how often should you wash your sheets, according to experts?

Hint: It's a lot more frequent than 24 days.

While there is no definitive number of days or weeks, most experts recommend swapping out used sheets for clean ones every week or two.

Dermatologist Alok Vij, MD told Cleveland Clinic that people should wash their sheets at least every two weeks, but probably more often if you have pets, live in a hot climate, sweat a lot, are recovering from illness, have allergies or asthma or if you sleep naked.

We shed dead skin all the time, and friction helps those dead skin cells slough off, so imagine what's happening every time you roll over and your skin rubs on the sheets. It's normal to sweat in your sleep, too, so that's also getting on your sheets. And then there's dander and dust mites and dirt that we carry around on us just from living in the world, all combining to make for pretty dirty sheets in a fairly short period of time, even if they look "clean."

Maybe if you shower before bed and always wear clean pajamas you could get by with a two-week sheet swap cycle, but weekly sheet cleaning seems to be the general consensus among the experts. The New York Times consulted five books about laundry and cleaning habits, and once a week was what they all recommend.

Sorry, once-a-monthers. You may want to step up your sheet game a bit.

What about the rest of your bedding? Blankets and comforters and whatnot?

Sleep.com recommends washing your duvet cover once a week, but this depends on whether you use a top sheet. Somewhere between the Gen X and Millennial eras, young folks stopped being about the top sheet life, just using their duvet with no top sheet. If that's you, wash that baby once a week. If you do use a top sheet, you can go a couple weeks longer on the duvet cover.

For blankets and comforters and duvet inserts, Sleep.com says every 3 months. And for decorative blankets and quilts that you don't really use, once a year washing will suffice.

What about pillows? Pillowcases should go in with the weekly sheet washing, but pillows themselves should be washed every 3 to 6 months. Washing pillows can be a pain, and if you don't do it right, you can end up with a lumpy pillow, but it's a good idea because between your sweat, saliva and skin cells, pillows can start harboring bacteria.

Finally, how about the mattress itself? Home influencers on TikTok can often be seen stripping their beds, sprinkling their mattress with baking soda, brushing it into the mattress fibers and then vacuuming it all out. Architectural Digest says the longer you leave baking soda on the mattress, the better—at least a few hours, but preferably overnight. Some people add a few drops of essential oil to the baking soda for some extra yummy smell.

If that all sounds like way too much work, maybe just start with the sheets. Pick a day of the week and make it your sheet washing day. You might find that climbing into a clean, fresh set of sheets more often is a nice way to feel pampered without a whole lot of effort.

Joy

Teacher asks teen daughter to mend a student's coat and gets it back with a funny surprise

“My student was grinning when he showed me the note. He kept looking at it in class and smiling..."

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Sweetness stitched into every bit of this story.

Some stories are wholesome. Others are hilarious. Others still restore some faith in humanity. This one is a combination of all three.

A teacher shared on Reddit how he took his student’s torn coat home so that his crafty daughter could mend the pocket. As he explained in his post, the student didn't seem to have the funds to fix it on his own or replace the jacket.

His daughter didn’t only sew up the jacket, but left her own cheeky bit of “11th grade advice” in note hidden in the coat’s pocket.

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Parenting

Woman reveals the meaningful phrase her mom used that changed her life as a child

"I feel like this would even benefit adults in a marriage, friendship, etc."

Woman reveals magic phrase mom used that changed her life

There's always advice out there for parents that promise to be the game changer everyone's been looking for but since every child is different, the claim rarely rings true. But this piece of advice might just do the thing it claims because it's such a simple shift and allows for both parent and child to feel validated in tough situations.

Anjuli Paschall recently posted a video sharing a phrase her mom used with her as a child that changed her life. She shares that over Christmas break she was washing the family's antique china, five of the fragile dishes fell to the floor and shattered. At the sound of the noise, Paschall's mom screamed from the other room, "I love you more than those dishes."

A simple reassuring phrase that Paschall has heard all of her life reassuring her that mistakes happen but her mom will always love her more.

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Education

Expert breaks down brilliant way for answering the 'hardest interview question'

Career advisor Erin McGoff has some helpful info for navigating what she called one of the 'trickiest' parts of a job interview.

@advicewitherin/Instagram, used with permission

This part of the interview almost always comes up, and it's almost always uncomfortable.

Job hunting literally can feel like you’re out in the Sahara scavenging for your next meal…all the while knowing that there are dozens of other hunters just as starving as you are, and that there doesn’t seem to be enough morsels to go around. It all makes one anxiety-laden psychic landmine, forgive the mix of metaphors.

Even after you’ve used all the tips and tricks to make your resume stand out in a sea of other applications, using every viable SEO keyword you can scrounge up, and you do finally get the coveted interview, the stress is far from over. Certain questions feel more like traps than anything else.

But just like everything in life, a little prep, along with some expert advice, goes a long way.

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