It's terrible what's happening to reefs, but coral 'seedlings' could help.
Photo via iStock.

Coral reefs support about a quarter of all life in the ocean.

Diving through one, you can see oodles of different, brightly colored inhabitants, from delicate butterflyfish and snapping shrimp to massive sharks and octopi. Reefs are some of our best fishing grounds, tourist attractions, and natural defenses against storm surges.

With all that coral reefs give, it seems like a tragedy to see what we're giving back to them.

We overfish our reefs, break them with anchors and trawlers — even use cyanide and dynamite on them. What's worse, climate change and the warmer weather it brings can cause massive bleaching episodes, which can be fatal to the coral.


Bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef. Photo via Acropora/Wikimedia Commons.

Even if we can't completely protect wild reefs, we can help replant them.

Like replanting saplings after a forest fire, some researchers and conservation groups have been experimenting with replanting reefs.

The go-to method is to take tiny samples from a wild coral then raise and propagate the "saplings" before planting them again in the wild.

On July 25, 2017, University of Miami biologist Stephanie Schopmeyer showed that this method has some real promise. In a new paper, she and her team documented how they used this replanting idea to help restore endangered elkhorn coral colonies along the coasts of Florida and Puerto Rico. This not only demonstrates the method's success, but also provides a guide and benchmark for other groups going forward.

It's an awesome scientific step in helping us give back and protect ocean life. But there's plenty that non-scientists can do to make a difference.

Cities and states have used shipwrecks, statues, even military tanks to help build artificial reefs. Scuba divers can help by signing up to help replant the corals or pick up floating trash.

Photo via iStock.

On land, you can sign up for beach cleanups, donate to conservation initiatives, or just helping slow the damage by eating sustainable seafood, reducing our trash, and fighting climate change.

Coral reefs are one of the wonders of the natural world. They deserve a little help.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

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Quantum immortality?

Might we never really pass on into nothingness? Has the world ended many times before? Are we in fact doomed to spend eternity unknowingly jumping from one dimension to the next? According to one TikTok theory, the answer is yes. And it's blowing millions of minds worldwide.

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