Photo via iStock.

Coral reefs support about a quarter of all life in the ocean.

Diving through one, you can see oodles of different, brightly colored inhabitants, from delicate butterflyfish and snapping shrimp to massive sharks and octopi. Reefs are some of our best fishing grounds, tourist attractions, and natural defenses against storm surges.

With all that coral reefs give, it seems like a tragedy to see what we're giving back to them.

We overfish our reefs, break them with anchors and trawlers — even use cyanide and dynamite on them. What's worse, climate change and the warmer weather it brings can cause massive bleaching episodes, which can be fatal to the coral.


Bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef. Photo via Acropora/Wikimedia Commons.

Even if we can't completely protect wild reefs, we can help replant them.

Like replanting saplings after a forest fire, some researchers and conservation groups have been experimenting with replanting reefs.

The go-to method is to take tiny samples from a wild coral then raise and propagate the "saplings" before planting them again in the wild.

On July 25, 2017, University of Miami biologist Stephanie Schopmeyer showed that this method has some real promise. In a new paper, she and her team documented how they used this replanting idea to help restore endangered elkhorn coral colonies along the coasts of Florida and Puerto Rico. This not only demonstrates the method's success, but also provides a guide and benchmark for other groups going forward.

It's an awesome scientific step in helping us give back and protect ocean life. But there's plenty that non-scientists can do to make a difference.

Cities and states have used shipwrecks, statues, even military tanks to help build artificial reefs. Scuba divers can help by signing up to help replant the corals or pick up floating trash.

Photo via iStock.

On land, you can sign up for beach cleanups, donate to conservation initiatives, or just helping slow the damage by eating sustainable seafood, reducing our trash, and fighting climate change.

Coral reefs are one of the wonders of the natural world. They deserve a little help.

via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

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Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

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Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

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Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


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