Culture

Homophobe gets flawlessly murdered by words for comparing Pride Month to Nazi Germany.

This clap-back deserves its own parade πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ³οΈπŸŒˆπŸ³οΈπŸŒˆπŸ³οΈπŸŒˆ

Homophobe gets flawlessly murdered by words for comparing Pride Month to Nazi Germany.



It's Pride Month, which many members of the heterosexual community choose to interpret as a time to celebrate their desire for victim hood by whining about how they don't get a month/parade/enough attention. It's exhausting and takes energy and focus away from the whole point of Pride Month: celebrating and empowering the LGBTQ community, and also, selling them things.



A prime example of attention-deprived cis, straight folks trying to make Pride Month about THEM, as if every freaking day isn't already about them, comes from a guy who goes by "A Gift from God" on Twitter. Sure, if by "God" you mean a cat, and by "gift" you mean a partially decomposing rat carcass.


This guy recently posted one of the worst tweets I've ever seen, and I've seen all the tweets. It did not end well for him. Here is the tweet, I am sorry:



"Being a heterosexual during #PrideMonth is like being a Jew back in nazi Germany," he wrote, before making his profile private (surely the best and only good decision this man has ever made). But too lateβ€”because this very, very, very bad tweet was captured by someone who posted it on Reddit, where it provoked this absolutely perfect clap-back from someone who goes by "GaydolphShitler." They wrote:

It's true. A sympathetic gay couple have sheltered me in their attic for the last 5 days. The gaystapo came yesterday and interrogated my benefactors, but they didn't search the house. At least not this time.
I'm putting them in terrible danger, but I don't know what else to do. I know what happens to those who protect breeders. They know it too. How long will the be willing to risk their lives for me? I trust them; I have to. What happens when the closet police come back, though? What happens when they are forced to choose between their safety and mine? I pray it doesn't come to that.
A crowd was marching in the street today. I could hear then chanting "YASS QUEEN, YASS QUEEN" through the walls of my hiding place. I can't tell if it's the stomp of their thigh high boots or my own shaking, but it feels like an earthquake. An earthquake inside my own head... my god, there's so many of them. I need to stay positive, but I can feel the spidery thread of hope slipping through my fingers.
Why didn't I listen after homonacht? I could have left. There was still time, but I didn't listen. There's no escape now; only hiding. Hiding and waiting for Pride Month to be over.

And THAT, my friends, is how you murder someone with words. The beautiful and epic takedown was captured and reposted on the sub-Reddit "MurderedByWords" where it went extremely viral. Here you can see the entire exchange in all its beauty:



Never been prouder to be a member of the LGBTQ community AND the Reddit community. Happy Pride to all except the homophobic shitbags!!!!!!

This article originally appeared on SomeeCards. You can read it here.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

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In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us β€” Veterans included β€” have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon