Heroes

His mansion is really nice, but the part I like the best is WAAAY out back.

It's kind of scary.We depend on bees for so much of our food supply, but the little buzzers are disappearing.

His mansion is really nice, but the part I like the best is WAAAY out back.

What is colony collapse disorder?

There are three types of bees in a colony: queen (the only female who can reproduce and/or run the whole shiz), workers (females who carry pollen and nectar to the hive for food and sting yo ass), and drones (males who pretty much do nothing but wait for the queen to get ready to do the nasty).

A colony is considered lost to CCD when the worker bees disappear leaving the queen and baby bees.


We're not talking about a hive with a bunch of dead bees all around it. There is no trace of the worker bees anywhere — ANYWHERE.

Why should I care about CCD?

Because bees make these possible, and you like eating them:

Yup. Bees pollinate all these plants and foods and many, many more. Without bees, many fruits and vegetables would be unable to reproduce. Which means NO MORE GUACAMOLE.

Well if these "neonic" pesticides are causing it like Moby said, why don't people just stop using them?

But it's not as cut and dry as our dear DJ paints it to be. The claim started with several Harvard studies (in April 2012 and May 2014) that linked neonic pesticides and CCD. However, the methodology and conclusions of those studies has been called into question by a lot of folks.

Though apiologists (that's the fancy name for scientists who study bees) are concerned about pesticides (including neonics), there are other things they point to as potential causes for CCD:

  • Harmful organisms such as parasites, fungi, or viruses
  • The practice of bee rentals (did you know you could rent a hive of bees to pollinate your lovely field o' strawberries?)
  • Selective breeding resulting in reduced genetic biodiversity
  • Overuse of bee antibiotics
  • Weakened immune systems from malnutrition

Researchers believe that CCD is most likely caused by the combination of these and other factors.

I like guacamole and fruit parfaits. I want to help save the bees! What do I do?

I don't blame you; guacamole and fruit parfaits are delicious.

Black belt bee saver: Put an apiary (bee apartment building) in your backyard and care for it.

Blue belt bee saver: Plant pesticide-free bee friendly plants near the edge of your yard.

White belt bee saver: Share this post with other guacamole lovers!

HIYAA!

via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less