Check out this church from the 1500s that appeared in a body of water, due to a drought.

Droughts are not good, but let's marvel for just a minute at something pretty cool that we're catching a glimpse of because of one.

A church from the mid-1500s rose from the waters — not literally, of course, because buildings don't generally tend to rise from the waters — when the water levels dropped dramatically, exposing the aging structure.


The New York Daily News created a video about the church, which is pretty darn amazing.

GIFs by New York Daily News.

This is the Temple of Quechula, and it was built in 1564.

It's located in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. Also known as the Temple of Santiago, it was abandoned because of the plague between 1773 and 1776, which seems like a pretty legit reason to abandon a church if you ask me. And almost 200 years later, in 1966, it was submerged under almost 100 feet of water when a dam was constructed nearby, reports the Associated Press.

In 2002, water levels dropped enough that people could actually walk through the ruins. Now, reports the AP, "a drought this year has hit the watershed of the Grijalva river, dropping the water level in the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir by 25 meters (82 feet)."

That 82-foot drop in water level is enough to allow for some pretty amazing photos — and even visits from folks who want to do a bit of climbing.

Pretty cool, huh?

Iglesia de Quechula #exploringchiapas #chiapas #llenatedechiapas #rioschiapas #chiapasrivers #nature #underwaterstructure #underwaterchurch #iglesiaquechula #quechula
A photo posted by Exploring Chiapas (@exploringchiapas) on


Iglesia de Quechula #exploringchiapas #chiapas #llenatedechiapas #rioschiapas #chiapasrivers #nature #underwaterstructure #underwaterchurch #iglesiaquechula #quechula
A photo posted by Exploring Chiapas (@exploringchiapas) on


Iglesia de Quechula #exploringchiapas #chiapas #llenatedechiapas #rioschiapas #chiapasrivers #nature #underwaterstructure #underwaterchurch #iglesiaquechula #quechula
A photo posted by Exploring Chiapas (@exploringchiapas) on

Getting an up-close view of an ancient structure like this one is probably one of the few upsides to a drought. But it's certainly worth enjoying because it's not every day that a nearly 500-year-old church appears out of the water.

Watch the clip for more neat images:

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.