Heroes

A food delivery business is so into the idea of saving the world that you can see it.

“Pizza always tastes better when it's delivered by a man in spandex."

A food delivery business is so into the idea of saving the world that you can see it.

Pizza delivery people in capes and spandex, huh?

In uptown Minneapolis, you might see a bearded man in a cape driving a tiny electric car. And no, it wouldn't be a joke.

It would be Captain Awesome, the marquee superhero of Galactic Pizza, delivering a pie to a hungry customer. When he arrives at his destinations, sometimes people laugh, sometimes they stare, and if you ask him, he says dons the costume "for the kids."

But in reality, these costumes aren't just some crazy gimmick to get people to buy pizzas (OK, maybe a little.) They represent something much bigger.


Images via Zagat.

Pete Bonahoom, the owner of Galactic Pizza, had a vision of saving the planet when he started his business.

He knew he wanted to open a pizza joint, but it needed to be something different, something more epic than a boring old restaurant. It's what he liked to call a "values-led business," which means that the science-fiction-themed eatery puts its positive vision and values above turning a supervillain-sized profit.

So how does this "values-led," earth-saving, pizza-eating thing work?

Locally sourced, organic, fresh, and DELICIOUS.

For Galactic Pizza, there are as many ways to save the world as there are delicious toppings.

They offer organic menu items and, in season, try to use locally sourced ingredients.

They strive to use packaging that's either recycled or 100% biodegradable.

Menus are printed on hemp instead of regular paper (you can read into that whatever you want), and they are in 3D! Far out!

Since pizza boxes can't be recycled thanks to cheesy, greasy goodness, Galactic has implemented a composting program. In exchange for returning that grease magnet, customers get a discount.

The restaurant is run on renewable wind energy.

And the delivery cars, when conditions allow, are 100% electric and 100% awesome.

Galactic's futuristic fleet of adorable electric cars.

Each delivery driver has their own alter ego, complete with a costume and catchy superhero name.

Some, like Lights Out, have even made conservation their super power!

He wants to know: What's your superpower?

Galactic Pizza is navigating the "new frontier" of being community-focused and sustainable.

There are businesses with like-minded values in each of our communities. They understand their responsibility to us as customers, the neighborhood they are in, and the greater good of the earth.

As businesses continue to recognize that being good to the planet is everyone's responsibility and can be done with even a little extra effort, more of them will catch on and the vision will spread, which is awesome all the way around.

Galactic Pizza has envisioned a future where the world is a sustainable, harmonious place, and they are doing their part. Is Galactic Pizza perfect? Probably not. But they are laser-focused on making sure they do the best they can, and they are having a great time in the process.

Pizza and social good? I'll raise a slice to that.

Image via Giphy.

Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

Keep Reading Show less
Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Virginia is poised to become the 23rd U.S. state—and first state in the South—to ban the death penalty after lawmakers on Monday approved legislation prohibiting the practice.

"We're dismantling the remnants of Jim Crow here in the New South. Abolishing the death penalty is another step on that journey," tweeted Democratic Del. Jay Jones, who's running for state attorney general.

Both chambers of the General Assembly passed earlier versions already this month. On Monday, the Senate passed the House bill in a 22-16 vote; the House then voted 57-43 on the measure to ban capital punishment. Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam has indicated his support for the measure.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

Keep Reading Show less

This morning, Joe and Jill Biden went out for a walk with their dogs, Champ and Major, to check out the surprise the first lady had installed overnight for Valentine's Day weekend. The White House lawn has been decorated with oversized hearts that have positive words like LOVE, GRATITUDE, COMPASSION, and FAMILY on them. The one that says HEALING is signed "Love, Jill."

As they walked along with coffee cups in hand, the first couple was met by a few members of the press. The conversation that they had has gone viral—not so much because of how extraordinary it was, but rather the opposite. It was delightfully ordinary, filled with normalcy, decency, and even a random act of kindness for good measure. And the simple goodness of it all is moving people to tears.

Keep Reading Show less

Just over a month after passing the grim milestone of 400,000 deaths from COVID-19, the United States has surpassed another one. As of today, more than half a million Americans have been lost to the virus that's held the world in a pandemic holding pattern for almost a year. It's a number that seemed unfathomable even six months ago, and yet here we are.

Despite increasing vaccine rollouts allowing us to see the light at the end of the tunnel, the loss we've experienced is immense. Having a president who not only understands loss on a personal level—having endured the tragic loss of his wife and baby daughter earlier in life and the death of his son just six years ago—but who conveys with compassion the grief of the nation as we mark this milestone is a comforting change.

Tonight, the White House honored the 500,000+ lives lost with a display of 500 candles lining the steps of the building, with each candle representing 1000 Americans. The president and first lady, along with the vice president and second gentleman, held a memorial moment of silence outside the South Portico as a military band played "Amazing Grace."

Keep Reading Show less