Heroes

A food delivery business is so into the idea of saving the world that you can see it.

“Pizza always tastes better when it's delivered by a man in spandex."

Pizza delivery people in capes and spandex, huh?

In uptown Minneapolis, you might see a bearded man in a cape driving a tiny electric car. And no, it wouldn't be a joke.

It would be Captain Awesome, the marquee superhero of Galactic Pizza, delivering a pie to a hungry customer. When he arrives at his destinations, sometimes people laugh, sometimes they stare, and if you ask him, he says dons the costume "for the kids."

But in reality, these costumes aren't just some crazy gimmick to get people to buy pizzas (OK, maybe a little.) They represent something much bigger.


Images via Zagat.

Pete Bonahoom, the owner of Galactic Pizza, had a vision of saving the planet when he started his business.

He knew he wanted to open a pizza joint, but it needed to be something different, something more epic than a boring old restaurant. It's what he liked to call a "values-led business," which means that the science-fiction-themed eatery puts its positive vision and values above turning a supervillain-sized profit.

So how does this "values-led," earth-saving, pizza-eating thing work?

Locally sourced, organic, fresh, and DELICIOUS.

For Galactic Pizza, there are as many ways to save the world as there are delicious toppings.

They offer organic menu items and, in season, try to use locally sourced ingredients.

They strive to use packaging that's either recycled or 100% biodegradable.

Menus are printed on hemp instead of regular paper (you can read into that whatever you want), and they are in 3D! Far out!

Since pizza boxes can't be recycled thanks to cheesy, greasy goodness, Galactic has implemented a composting program. In exchange for returning that grease magnet, customers get a discount.

The restaurant is run on renewable wind energy.

And the delivery cars, when conditions allow, are 100% electric and 100% awesome.

Galactic's futuristic fleet of adorable electric cars.

Each delivery driver has their own alter ego, complete with a costume and catchy superhero name.

Some, like Lights Out, have even made conservation their super power!

He wants to know: What's your superpower?

Galactic Pizza is navigating the "new frontier" of being community-focused and sustainable.

There are businesses with like-minded values in each of our communities. They understand their responsibility to us as customers, the neighborhood they are in, and the greater good of the earth.

As businesses continue to recognize that being good to the planet is everyone's responsibility and can be done with even a little extra effort, more of them will catch on and the vision will spread, which is awesome all the way around.

Galactic Pizza has envisioned a future where the world is a sustainable, harmonious place, and they are doing their part. Is Galactic Pizza perfect? Probably not. But they are laser-focused on making sure they do the best they can, and they are having a great time in the process.

Pizza and social good? I'll raise a slice to that.

Image via Giphy.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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