4 points later, you'll understand rainbow clouds.
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Universal Pictures: Everest

In a life full of emails, it's easy to forget that sometimes there are literally rainbows shining in the clouds.

...a cloud became a rainbow.


This exists. Nature is crazy. Science is crazy. See if you can take a moment to embrace this and have a zen moment with it.

It was captured by Flickr user Stefanos Nikologianis just near the Tengboche Monastery on Mount Everest.

Gaze upon the majesty. It's a cloud rainbow shining over Mount Everest of all places. Goodness.

Trust the zen cat. Nature loves you.

Sooooo ... why does nature turn Mount Everest into a rainbow marshmallow dreamland from time to time?

How does nature create this rainbow magic?

My favorite four-sentence explanation for why this rainbow cloud happens comes straight from Reddit user Sierraboi. It's pretty poetic!

1.

These rainbow clouds aren't unique to Mount Everest either, though of course they look extra gorgeous surrounded by all that Everesty goodness. Rainbow clouds are more particular to clouds where the ice crystals or droplets are about the same size.

2.

Because Mount Everest is so tall, clouds can get low. This means the clouds are close to the cold air and more moisture, which results in crystals forming. The moisture in the clouds turns to crystals that float on the edges of the clouds. The position of the sun and the hexagonal shape and angle of the tiny ice crystals in the clouds makes the rainbows!

3.


Normally clouds don't have the right conditions to refract light (which is why you don't see rainbow clouds everywhere ... bummer). But, for example, when there's a rainstorm, there's enough moisture in the air to refract light.

4.

There's enough condensed moisture (in the form of crystals) in the air to make rainbow clouds! So that's whatcha get.

Gorgeous rainbow crystals just floating about in the beautiful Mount Everest sky.

BOOM!

"Cold air aloft; resulting in ice crystals forming. Thus, light refracts off the crystals, giving the rainbow color."

I love investigating natural phenomenons only to realize that it's just nature doing the nature science-art that it does everywhere — in this case, rainbow-making — only on a slightly different canvas.

It's a nice zen nature break. You deserve it.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.