23 un-American things you can totally do in America, no matter what Donald Trump says.

Just before 7 this morning, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted a call to jail or denaturalize anyone who burns the American flag.

As is the case with most things Trump, theories about, well ... why he tweeted this have run the gamut — from an attempt to distract from a report on son-in-law Jared Kushner's conflicts of interest to a devious plan to incite people to actually do it and use the backlash to consolidate his support to a typically impulsive response to something he saw on Fox News.

Regardless, it's a pretty stunning — and frightening — proposal. For a man who wants to make America great again, the tweet demonstrates a complete disregard for what makes America great in the first place: the First Amendment.


That amendment guarantees that each and every one of us can do any number of highly inadvisable, morally suspect, un-American things — short of yelling "fire" in a crowded theater — and the U.S. government can't do a damn thing about it. Sure, your fellow citizens can slide you a massive side-eye, argue with you, or condemn you, but you won't be arrested or have your passport taken away.

Indeed, thanks to the genius of the framers and the First Amendment, in America, you can...

1. Belt Toto's "Africa" at the top of your lungs while everyone else sings the pregame national anthem at Fenway Park.

Photo via iStock.

No matter how deeply punchable this would make you, you can't be arrested for singing the first verse-into-chorus of this classic '80s jam.

2. Photoshop a giant thumbs-down into a picture of Arches National Park.

Thumb photo via iStock. Background photo by Harvey Meston/Getty Images.

It's one of the most stunning vistas in the entire world. And thanks to James Madison, you are fully free to heckle it at your leisure.

3. Enjoy the song stylings of the North Korean girl group Moranbong.

Photo by Ed Jones/Getty Images.

The propaganda K-pop knockoff quintet shouldn't be your favorite band, but if they are, you are legally permitted to do you in that regard!

4. Tweet "Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag - if they do, there must be consequences - perhaps loss of citizenship or a year in jail!"

As ill-advised and constitutionally suspect as this is, it's within your rights to do so, even if you're soon to be the most powerful person in the country.

5. Dump a full bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken down a storm drain.

Photo via iStock.

This is an obviously terrible idea, both as a practical and symbolic gesture. But you can still do it. Because America.

6. Call Vladimir Putin on his personal cell to tell him he's a swell guy.

Photo by Alexey Druzhinin/Getty Images.

As long as you're not giving away state secrets, if you've got his number, you're good to chat with America's biggest frenemy!

7. Reply "Nah, I'm good" when offered a slice of apple pie.  

Photo via iStock.

Thanks, though!

8. Sneak up behind a bald eagle and yell "I know at least three blue jays that could kick your ass!"

Doesn't matter how skeptical the eagle is. Photo by Lewis Hulbert/Wikimedia Commons.

He's probably too much of a wimp to nip your eyes out anyway.

9. Protest soldiers' funerals while yelling homophobic slurs at their grieving relatives.

Photo by Mira Oberman/AFP/Getty Images.

This is perhaps the most morally odious thing you can possibly do. And yet, you're allowed to do it in America, which, believe it or not, is kind of fantastic.

10. Say "Soccer is better than football."

Photo by Gabriele Maltini/Getty Images.

Hell, you can even say "Soccer is football." No one can throw you out of here for that.

11. Refuse to accept American Express for purchases at your hardware store, deli, or pharmacy.

Photo by Clemson/Flickr.

Just because they have "American" in their name doesn't mean you have to roll over for their 3% surcharge.

12. Decide, for some reason, to be a Nazi.

Nazis protest the opening of a Holocaust museum in Illinois because that's pretty much their beat. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

To be clear, you absolutely, 100% shouldn't be a Nazi. And if you are a Nazi, if you assault or murder any minorities, you're going to get nabbed by the feds and you will deserve it (hate speech and hate crimes are wildly different things, according to the law). But whether you're a full-on Nazi marching down Main Street to terrify Holocaust survivors in a Chicago bedroom community or a kind-of secret Nazi that dresses up and stuffs chicken parm sliders down your throat at a swanky conference in Washington, D.C., you're legally allowed to exist and shout out the terrible things you believe as the rest of us ignore you.

In America, you're allowed to be a Nazi.

13. Book a paid appearance on Russian state television.

Incoming National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Not only can you cash in on that sweet geopolitical rivalry, you can still be a top national security official in the president's cabinet! Sweet!

14. Say "I'm moving to Canada" every time your preferred political party loses an election.

No, you're not going to, but go nuts saying it!

15. Post anti-immigration screeds on Facebook even though all four of your grandparents were immigrants.

It's hypocritical as all hell — and it is your right as a hypocritical American to go there. Thanks, freedom of speech!

16. Root for Ivan Drago in "Rocky IV."

GIF from "Rocky IV"/United Artists.

Snap!

17. Root for Team Iceland in "D2: The Mighty Ducks."

GIF from "D2: The Mighty Ducks"/Walt Disney Pictures.

Boom!

18. Root for the aliens in "Independence Day."

GIF from "Independence Day"/20th Century Fox.

Ka-blam!

19. Fly the Confederate flag.

Photo by Mark Hazlett/Getty Images.

It's the banner of actual traitors who killed hundreds of thousands of Americans in the name of enslaving millions of other Americans, and you can celebrate it as long and hard as you want here.

People will probably yell at you, as is their right, and that's also great. Super American 5000 all-around!

20. Tell anyone who will listen that paying taxes is B.S.

A Brooklyn woman meets with a tax preparer. Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images.

Sure, it's cool to have roads, bridges, schools, fire departments, a military, and health care, but you're still allowed to hate on the IRS with total impunity. You know, as long as you do pay your taxes.

21. Back your truck up over a copy of the "Hamilton" original cast recording.

"Hamilton" is, without question, the patriotic feel-good album of the year, revitalizing interest in America's founding while boasting such instant classics as "My Shot," "Satisfied," and "The Room Where it Happens." And you are perfectly covered if you choose to smash it to bits under your four-wheel drive.

22. Burn the American flag.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Torching the Stars and Stripes is not particularly safe, nor is it generally an effective means of protest. Honestly, you should definitely think twice before burning the flag (unless you're a Boy Scout).

Still, you are fully, unequivocally, 100% within your rights as a citizen to light that baby up if you so choose. Which leads to...

23. You can totally call out a tweet from the president-elect of the United States for being ridiculously un-American.

Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Just because a person is powerful doesn't mean they're above criticism.

Just because a president-elect floats an idea doesn't mean we have to accept or agree with it — liberal, conservative, or otherwise.

Just because the head of the executive branch of the U.S. government issues a statement doesn't mean it reflects the values we hold in common.

The president can say whatever he wants. Just like every other citizen.

In return, Americans can (and should!) remind him when things he says are wrong, dangerous, and — frankly — un-American.

This is America, after all.

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I'm staring at my screen watching the President of the United States speak before a stadium full of people in North Carolina. He launches into a lie-laced attack on Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, and the crowd boos. Soon they start chanting, "Send her back! Send her back! Send her back!"

The President does nothing. Says nothing. He just stands there and waits for the crowd to finish their outburst.

WATCH: Trump rally crowd chants 'send her back' after he criticizes Rep. Ilhan Omar www.youtube.com

My mind flashes to another President of the United States speaking to a stadium full of people in North Carolina in 2016. A heckler in the crowd—an old man in uniform holding up a TRUMP sign—starts shouting, disrupting the speech. The crowd boos. Soon they start chanting, "Hillary! Hillary! Hillary!"

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What will future generations never believe that we tolerated in 2019?

Dolphin and orca captivity, for sure. They'll probably shake their heads at how people died because they couldn't afford healthcare. And, they'll be completely mystified at the amount of food some people waste while others go starving.

According to Biological Diversity, "An estimated 40 percent of the food produced in the United States is wasted every year, costing households, businesses and farms about $218 billion annually."

There are so many things wrong with this.

First of all it's a waste of money for the households who throw out good food. Second, it's a waste of all of the resources that went into growing the food, including the animals who gave their lives for the meal. Third, there's something very wrong with throwing out food when one in eight Americans struggle with hunger.

Supermarkets are just as guilty of this unnecessary waste as consumers. About 10% of all food waste are supermarket products thrown out before they've reached their expiration date.

Three years ago, France took big steps to combat food waste by making a law that bans grocery stores from throwing away edible food.According to the new ordinance, stores can be fined for up to $4,500 for each infraction.

Previously, the French threw out 7.1 million tons of food. Sixty-seven percent of which was tossed by consumers, 15% by restaurants, and 11% by grocery stores.

This has created a network of over 5,000 charities that accept the food from supermarkets and donate them to charity. The law also struck down agreements between supermarkets and manufacturers that prohibited the stores from donating food to charities.

"There was one food manufacturer that was not authorized to donate the sandwiches it made for a particular supermarket brand. But now, we get 30,000 sandwiches a month from them — sandwiches that used to be thrown away," Jacques Bailet, head of the French network of food banks known as Banques Alimentaires, told NPR.

It's expected that similar laws may spread through Europe, but people are a lot less confident at it happening in the United States. The USDA believes that the biggest barrier to such a program would be cost to the charities and or supermarkets.

"The logistics of getting safe, wholesome, edible food from anywhere to people that can use it is really difficult," the organization said according to Gizmodo. "If you're having to set up a really expensive system to recover marginal amounts of food, that's not good for anybody."

Plus, the idea may seem a little too "socialist" for the average American's appetite.

"The French version is quite socialist, but I would say in a great way because you're providing a way where they [supermarkets] have to do the beneficial things not only for the environment, but from an ethical standpoint of getting healthy food to those who need it and minimizing some of the harmful greenhouse gas emissions that come when food ends up in a landfill," Jonathan Bloom, the author of American Wasteland, told NPR.

However, just because something may be socialist doesn't mean it's wrong. The greater wrong is the insane waste of money, damage to the environment, and devastation caused by hunger that can easily be avoided.

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