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Single mom's advice for anyone with sons on Thanksgiving is a must read

She was shocked by the amount of reactions—both good and bad—that her viral tweet ignited.

thanksgiving dinner ideas, thanksgiving, family, parenting
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One single mom went viral for encouraging parents to let boys help with the holiday cooking

Last year, single mom Emily Taylor made some sound Thanksgiving advice that is still great food for thought.

As Taylor shared with Today.com, she had been talking with another parent, one who had two adult sons, when they argued that “boys can't stay in the kitchen all day like girls can when helping with Thanksgiving stuff.”

Taylor was, as she put it, “flabbergasted,” and continued to ponder that comment until she was compelled to share her own thoughts on the subject.


In a post shared to X, formerly known as Twitter, Taylor urged families to rethink how they view gender roles for the upcoming holiday.

"As we approach Thanksgiving, I beg of you please involve your boys in the preparations as much as you involve your girls," she wrote. "Let them measure and mix and bake and create alongside their sisters. Have them set the table and pour drinks. Make them help clean up too."

To sum things up, Taylor added, "don’t let another generation of boys grow up to be men who think the kitchen is the domain of women until it's time to cut the turkey,” adding that these outdated gender norms rob young boys the chance to learn valuable life skills.

"As a single mom, it's important for me to teach all of my kids to be self-sufficient, to participate in family life and to contribute to everything that's going on in our home,” she said.

While some parents were vehemently against Taylor’s stance, many other parents agreed, even adding that inviting young boys in to do some of the Thanksgiving cooking could help them discover a new hobby they would otherwise miss out on.

One mom wrote, “my 5-year-old loves baking. We ended up creating our own business.”

Another added, “some boys grow up to be great cooks. I want them to write books about their journey that brought them into the kitchen. We need more of whatever that is.”

Several men who did grow up learning to cook chimed in as well. One said, I grew up in an Italian family so I was put in the kitchen at an early age. Cooking is a love language. It’s therapeutic. Let me cook anytime and I’m in my happy place.”

Another comments, “my mom did that with me growing up and now I make Thanksgiving dinner for my family. I love it.”

One person even made a point that other domestic skills should really not be assigned to one particular gender, saying, “and if there’s a tire or oil to be changed, have your girls go out to help. My hubby takes our twin daughters out to the garage. It’s awesome.”

Taylor agreed, replying, “none of my kids are allowed to get their license until they can demonstrate they can change a tire.”

Taylor ultimately hopes that her viral tweet inspired parents to think about what messages they’re sending kids with certain holiday traditions.

“We can help dispel myths that are prescribed to certain genders," she says. "And who knows? Maybe more boys will learn to love cooking and more girls will love watching football when we're doing all of those things together."

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From political science to joining the fight against cancer: How one woman found her passion

An unexpected pivot to project management expanded Krystal Brady's idea of what it means to make a positive impact.

Krystal Brady/PMI

Krystal Brady utilizes her project management skills to help advance cancer research and advocacy.

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Cancer impacts nearly everyone’s life in one way or another, and thankfully, we’re learning more about treatment and prevention every day. Individuals and organizations dedicated to fighting cancer and promising research from scientists are often front and center, but we don’t always see the people working behind the scenes to make the fight possible.

People like Krystal Brady.

While studying political science in college, Brady envisioned her future self in public office. She never dreamed she’d build a successful career in the world of oncology, helping cancer researchers, doctors and advocates continue battling cancer, but more efficiently.

Brady’s journey to oncology began with a seasonal job at a small publishing company, which helped pay for college and awakened her love for managing projects. Now, 15 years later, she’s serving as director of digital experience and strategy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which she describes as “the perfect place to pair my love of project management and desire to make positive change in the world.”

As a project manager, Brady helps make big ideas for the improvement of diagnosing and treating cancer a reality. She is responsible for driving the critical projects that impact the lives of cancer researchers, doctors, and patients.

“I tell people that my job is part toolbox, part glue,” says Brady. “Being a project manager means being responsible for understanding the details of a project, knowing what tools or resources you need to execute the project, and facilitating the flow of that work to the best outcome possible. That means promoting communication, partnership, and ownership among the team for the project.”

At its heart, Brady’s project management work is about helping people. One of the big projects Brady is currently working on is ASCO’s digital transformation, which includes upgrading systems and applications to help streamline and personalize oncologists’ online experience so they can access the right resources more quickly. Whether you are managing humans or machines, there’s an extraordinary need for workers with the skillset to harness new technology and solve problems.

The digital transformation project also includes preparing for the use of emerging technologies such as generative AI to help them in their research and practices.

“Most importantly, it lays the groundwork for us to make a meaningful impact at the point of care, giving the oncologist and patient the absolute latest recommendations or guidelines for care for that specific patient or case, allowing the doctor to spend more time with their patients and less time on paperwork,” Brady says.

In today’s fast-changing, quickly advancing world, project management is perhaps more valuable than ever. After discovering her love for it, Brady earned her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification through Project Management Institute (PMI)—the premier professional organization for project managers with chapters all over the world—which she says gave her an edge over other candidates when she applied for her job at ASCO.

“The knowledge I gained in preparing for the PMP exam serves me every day in my role,” Brady says. “What I did not expect and have truly come to value is the PMI network as well – finding like-minded individuals, opportunities for continuous learning, and the ability to volunteer and give back.”

PMI’s growing community – including more than 300 chapters globally – serves as a place for project managers and individuals who use project management skills to learn and grow through events, online resources, and certification programs.

While people often think of project management in the context of corporate careers, all industries and organizations need project managers, making it a great career for those who want to elevate our world through non-profits or other service-oriented fields.

“Project management makes a difference by focusing on efficiency and outcomes, making us all a little better at what we do,” says Brady. “In almost every industry, understanding how to do our work more effectively and efficiently means more value to our customers, and the world at large, at an increased pace.”

Project management is also a stable career path in high demand as shown by PMI research, which found that the global economy will need 25 million more project managers by 2030 and that the median salary for project managers in the US has grown to $120K.

If you’d like to learn more about careers in project management, PMI has resources to help you get started or prove your proficiency, including its entry-level Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification program. For those interested in pursuing a project management career to make a difference, it could be your first step.
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