+
high gas; gas prices; store owner

Owner keeps gas prices lower.

Some things are just too good not to share, and here at Upworthy we work to find uplifting stories of the best of humanity to share with our audience. When 3TV/CBS5 reported on Jaswiendre Singh, a local gas station owner doing good, we had to share. Singh has been selling gas for nearly 50 cents cheaper than his purchase price in an effort to help his customers feel less pain at the pump due to high gas prices. The gas station owner and his wife have been working extra hours to make up for the money they’re losing on gasoline sales.


Singh told 3TV/CBS5 that his customers buy around 1,000 gallons of gas a day, which means he loses about $500 a day by underpricing his fuel. The loss doesn’t stop him because he wants to do what he can to help people with the rising cost of fuel. Filling up your gas tank for the work week is becoming more and more stressful as the average national gas price exceeds a record $5, and Arizona's price per gallon is even higher than the national average, according to AAA. But with Singh’s help, the people of Phoenix have a gas station they can trust to give them the best price possible, even if it means a loss for the owner.

Singh told the reporter at 3TV/CBS5, “My mother and my father did teach us to help if you have something. If you have something you have to share with other people.” Singh offsets the loss by more customers buying goods from inside the gas station.

Around the country, people continue to struggle as they try to afford gas for their vehicles. Soaring gas prices are leading to the use of reliable old methods to help save on the much-needed commodity—things like walking or biking places, using public transport, taking fewer grocery store runs and avoiding long road trips.

Not everyone can avoid driving their cars, however. Many people live in areas that don’t have access to public transportation or their homes are too far away to walk to their destination. These people may benefit from using apps like GasBuddy, Gas Guru, Waze or AAA TripTik Travel Planner, which help the user locate the cheapest gas in their area to help save a few cents a gallon.

Hopefully soon the gas prices will return to a somewhat normal level, but until then, people will continue to look for ways to save and maybe more people like Singh will find innovative ways to help. We’re all in what feels to be a gasoline crisis together and it’s amazing to see someone so willingly help people out without expecting anything in return.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

Keep ReadingShow less

The way makers use time makes meetings far more disruptive than they are for managers.

Most people don't look at their work calendar on any given day and say, "Yay! I have a meeting!" Most of us just understand and accept that meetings are a part of work life in most industries.

Some people, however, are far more negatively impacted by scheduled meetings than others. For people involved in creating or producing, meetings are actively disruptive to work in a way that isn't often the case for managers.

A viral post with an explanation from Paul Graham breaks down why.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Moms rally around Chrissy Teigen after she cautiously announces pregnancy two years after a loss

"I don’t think I’ll ever walk out of an appointment with more excitement than nerves but so far, everything is perfect and beautiful and I’m feeling hopeful and amazing."

Chrissy Teigen announces pregnancy.

Losing a baby is a tragedy at any stage of pregnancy, but losing a baby later in pregnancy can feel that much more devastating. Getting pregnant after loss is extremely anxiety-inducing, so when Chrissy Teigan cautiously announced she was pregnant with her fourth child, mothers who have experienced pregnancy loss collectively shared her apprehension.

Keep ReadingShow less