Yes, that really is Seth Rogen talking to you on the bus.

All aboard the Pineapple Express!

The comedian and actor has recorded a series of public announcements for the city of Vancouver's public transportation system. Rogen, Canadian by birth, said he wanted to give back to the city where he grew up.


"Hey Vancouver, it's Seth," one of his recorded messages begins. "Here's a tip to make your transit ride even more awesome: I know your bag is probably very nice and you care deeply for it, but that doesn't mean it needs its own seat."

The project started on Twitter after people suggested TransLink BC might need a new voice to bring some positive attention to its work and replace the former celebrity narrator, Morgan Freeman.

When someone suggested Rogen, he wrote back directly, saying, "Hit me up."

They did. And now it's all really happening.

"Any opportunity to enrich the lives of the Canadian people is an opportunity I will take," Rogen joked in a video of him recording his lines for the new initiative.

But Rogen also genuinely supports public transportation, saying, "I grew up taking public transit my whole life, and I still use public transit when I'm in the city."

And who can blame him? Transportation accounts for an estimated 29% of all greenhouse emissions in the U.S. alone. Reducing the number of cars on the road also cuts down on the amount of time people have to spend in traffic.

There have even been recent studies showing the direct impact public transportation can have on air quality — it makes a huge difference.

Convincing people to invest their time and money in public transit isn't always an easy sell. But having someone like Seth Rogen in your corner can get people excited about something as simple as taking the bus and quietly make a real difference.

Plus, who wouldn't want to ride the bus with him?

Photo from Dole
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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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LEGO recently unveiled plans to roll out a set of bricks for use by the visually impaired. Using each LEGO brick's 3-by-2 grid of raised dots, the educational toy includes bricks imprinted with every letter, number, and mathematical symbol in the braille alphabet.

Why LEGOs? Well, the American Printing House for the Blind recently found that only 8.4 percent of visually impaired children read Braille, as opposed to 50 percent in 1960. With the advent of audio books and voice-to-text technology, reading and writing are becoming lost arts for the visually impaired, often for lack of resources or time — modern braille education methods include expensive "Braille writers" or a slate and stylus, both of which create text that is difficult for students to edit or erase. LEGO bricks are not only swappable, but children are already familiar with their mechanics!

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Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger is a badass in the movies, but he's increasingly building a reputation as a heroic "action star" in real life. Only, instead of dropping ungodly amounts of fake bullets into his enemies, Schwarzenegger has been dropping rhetorical bombs against his political opponents while building intellectual and emotional bridges to those who disagree with him but still have open hearts and minds.

The most recent example found Arnold responding to a comment someone made on Facebook. On the surface, that may sound like just about the least unique or original jumping off point for a story.




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