Heroes

Some Folks Are Scared Of This Little Orphan Pup, But All He Wants Is A Little Pampering

Everything on this earth has its purpose. Some are just a little misunderstood.

Yep, they're called PUPS too. And there's a lot more to them than people realize.

Scroll down for more bat delight.


What an adorable way to learn something about our ecosystem.


Seed Dispersers: The rainforest is being destroyed, but guess who's helping to restore it? These hardworking little guys. They're so incredibly talented at dispersing seeds that it's garnered them the nickname "farmers of the tropics." OK, now I'm picturing them sipping on tropical cocktails on their days off. Piña colada anyone?


Pest Controllers: I'm not a fan of pesticides, but neither are farmers big fans of crop damage. Hmm, if only there were a flying creature that could help out with this problem. Wait, there is! Bats save the United States alone an estimated $3.7 billion a year by reducing crop damage and pesticide use. Can I get a high-five!? A high wing maybe? Don't leave me hanging. (Ya, pun intended.)


Pollinators: Save the bees! Hold on ... why are they getting all the credit? You can thank our furry, flying friends for bananas, peaches, and lots of other yummy goodness. When it comes to pollination, bats got game.

They won't replace the family dog, but they sure are cute.

*Did I just make up all that info above? Nope, I got if from Bat Conservation International. They have all sorts of interesting info on bats from around the world — just in case you're the curious type like me.*

I hope people can see these misunderstood creatures in a new light.

via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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