+
Man’s letter to ‘curvy’ wife inspires healthy debate.
via Robbie Tripp / Instagram

Over the past few years, the body positivity movement has gained considerable steam.

Stores like Target are no longer are afraid of hiring models that aren't a size zero. Sports Illustrated has been featuring plus-size models in its Swimsuit issue, and social media is full of women spreading the message of body positivity while sharing photos of their beautiful bodies as well.

But where are the men?

Sure there are a few guys out there fighting back against male beauty standards, but there aren't many who are encouraging body positivity in women.

That's why an open letter by Robbie Tripp to his wife Sarah Tripp is so important. Sarah is the voice behind Sassy Red Lipstick, a beauty blog that's shows larger women how to love themselves and to do so with style.


Sarah's husband, Robbie Tripp, is so proud of her that he took to Instagram to discuss his love for her. More importantly, he came out about his lifelong love of larger women that others might refer to as "chubby" or "fat."

He later realized that these women are marginalized by society and men have bought into a lie about what really makes women beautiful.

The post has received over 45,000 likes.



I love this woman and her curvy body. As a teenager, I was often teased by my friends for my attraction to girls on the thicker side, ones who were shorter and curvier, girls that the average (basic) bro might refer to as "chubby" or even "fat." Then, as I became a man and started to educate myself on issues such as feminism and how the media marginalizes women by portraying a very narrow and very specific standard of beauty (thin, tall, lean) I realized how many men have bought into that lie. For me, there is nothing sexier than this woman right here: thick thighs, big booty, cute little side roll, etc. Her shape and size won't be the one featured on the cover of Cosmopolitan but it's the one featured in my life and in my heart. There's nothing sexier to me than a woman who is both curvy and confident; this gorgeous girl I married fills out every inch of her jeans and is still the most beautiful one in the room. Guys, rethink what society has told you that you should desire. A real woman is not a porn star or a bikini mannequin or a movie character. She's real. She has beautiful stretch marks on her hips and cute little dimples on her booty. Girls, don't ever fool yourself by thinking you have to fit a certain mold to be loved and appreciated. There is a guy out there who is going to celebrate you for exactly who you are, someone who will love you like I love my Sarah.

After the post went viral, Sarah discussed it with Mic.

"I've always known Robbie loves my body just the way it is, but to see others chiming in and tagging their own significant other is so amazing!" she wrote in an email. "We never expected this post to go viral but it really connected with people around the world because of Robbie's beautiful words and the relatable topic."

Robbie also couldn't believe the response he received for his letter. So said thank you to all of his supporters with a post on Instagram.

"It's been incredible to see the reaction from my simple post celebrating my wife and her body," he wrote. "Seeing men from around the world tagging their girlfriend/wife and telling her how much they love her curvy body has been amazing. Thanks to each and every person who has commented and messaged us with your thoughtful words. It means the absolute world to us."

The fact that Robbie's letter is seen as brave shows just how far we need to come as a society when it comes to body acceptance. Hopefully, one day, it'll be common place to hear a man talk about how much he loves curvy women and how he rejects the unattainable beauty standards we see in magazines and on TV ads.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less
Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


Keep ReadingShow less

She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

Keep ReadingShow less