Man’s letter to ‘curvy’ wife inspires healthy debate.
via Robbie Tripp / Instagram

Over the past few years, the body positivity movement has gained considerable steam.

Stores like Target are no longer are afraid of hiring models that aren't a size zero. Sports Illustrated has been featuring plus-size models in its Swimsuit issue, and social media is full of women spreading the message of body positivity while sharing photos of their beautiful bodies as well.

But where are the men?

Sure there are a few guys out there fighting back against male beauty standards, but there aren't many who are encouraging body positivity in women.

That's why an open letter by Robbie Tripp to his wife Sarah Tripp is so important. Sarah is the voice behind Sassy Red Lipstick, a beauty blog that's shows larger women how to love themselves and to do so with style.


Sarah's husband, Robbie Tripp, is so proud of her that he took to Instagram to discuss his love for her. More importantly, he came out about his lifelong love of larger women that others might refer to as "chubby" or "fat."

He later realized that these women are marginalized by society and men have bought into a lie about what really makes women beautiful.

The post has received over 45,000 likes.



I love this woman and her curvy body. As a teenager, I was often teased by my friends for my attraction to girls on the thicker side, ones who were shorter and curvier, girls that the average (basic) bro might refer to as "chubby" or even "fat." Then, as I became a man and started to educate myself on issues such as feminism and how the media marginalizes women by portraying a very narrow and very specific standard of beauty (thin, tall, lean) I realized how many men have bought into that lie. For me, there is nothing sexier than this woman right here: thick thighs, big booty, cute little side roll, etc. Her shape and size won't be the one featured on the cover of Cosmopolitan but it's the one featured in my life and in my heart. There's nothing sexier to me than a woman who is both curvy and confident; this gorgeous girl I married fills out every inch of her jeans and is still the most beautiful one in the room. Guys, rethink what society has told you that you should desire. A real woman is not a porn star or a bikini mannequin or a movie character. She's real. She has beautiful stretch marks on her hips and cute little dimples on her booty. Girls, don't ever fool yourself by thinking you have to fit a certain mold to be loved and appreciated. There is a guy out there who is going to celebrate you for exactly who you are, someone who will love you like I love my Sarah.

After the post went viral, Sarah discussed it with Mic.

"I've always known Robbie loves my body just the way it is, but to see others chiming in and tagging their own significant other is so amazing!" she wrote in an email. "We never expected this post to go viral but it really connected with people around the world because of Robbie's beautiful words and the relatable topic."

Robbie also couldn't believe the response he received for his letter. So said thank you to all of his supporters with a post on Instagram.

"It's been incredible to see the reaction from my simple post celebrating my wife and her body," he wrote. "Seeing men from around the world tagging their girlfriend/wife and telling her how much they love her curvy body has been amazing. Thanks to each and every person who has commented and messaged us with your thoughtful words. It means the absolute world to us."

The fact that Robbie's letter is seen as brave shows just how far we need to come as a society when it comes to body acceptance. Hopefully, one day, it'll be common place to hear a man talk about how much he loves curvy women and how he rejects the unattainable beauty standards we see in magazines and on TV ads.

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