Look at the photos and videos of thousands of youth demanding climate change action NOW.

Watch out, world. The kids have shown up—and they are not here for our b.s. excuses.

Last year, 15-year-old Greta Thunberg sat on the steps of Swedish parliament, alone, to protest inaction on climate change. Today, at 16, she is leading hundreds of thousands of youth—and adult supporters—in a global school strike, filling the streets of cities and towns around the world for the same purpose.  

Her singular act of protest has turned into a massive movement of young people who are fed up with politicians and leaders playing Russian roulette with their future. On Friday, March 15, students are leaving school to tell governments that young people want immediate and meaningful action on the global climate crisis.


Thunberg and others have already sat on the steps of parliament buildings every Friday in a #FridaysforFuture movement, trying to urge governments to urgently enact policies that will help stave off accelerated global warming.

Today, that movement took a dramatic leap forward.

You have to see the hundreds of thousands of young people showing up at these rallies to believe it.

As of Friday morning, school strikes and rallies were taking place in more than 2000 locations in 123 countries. Check out these photos and videos pouring in from around the globe:

Several thousand people in New York City, U.S., with more on the way.

10,000+ people demonstrated in Copenhagen, Denmark.

At least 5,000 marched in Helsinki, Finland.

In Milan, Italy, people showed up by the tens of thousands—and even more attended rallies in 200 other locations in Italy alone.

Dublin, Ireland—again, numbers in the thousands.

25,000 students filled the streets of Berlin, Germany.

Are we getting the picture yet? Everyone who said that kids would just be skipping school to skip school were dead wrong.

The idea that kids don't really care about this or aren't educated enough about climate change to know what they're protesting is absurd. Kids learn about science and government in school. Scientists around the globe have made it clear that we have to get rising global temperatures under control or face dire consequences to life on our planet, while governments play political and economic games as they always do.

Kids don't care about such games. They want to inherit a healthy, habitable planet—and they're willing to fight for it.

Like these kids in Cape Town, South Africa:

And in Barcelona, Spain:

Check out the Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, New Zealand.

Maori Haka at the school strike at Nelson College, NZ.Tens, maybe hundreds of thousands students in New Zealand, Australia and East Asia. They are setting the standard high!Latest global update say:2052 places in 123 countries on all continents, including Antarctica. So, the question is:What will you do on March 15 2019? #schoolstrike4climate #FridaysForFuture #climatestrike #WhateverItTakes

Posted by Greta Thunberg on Friday, March 15, 2019

Are you tearing up yet? There's more:

Check out Hong Kong:

And Delhi, India:

And Ottawa, Canada:

And Lisbon, Portugal:

And Madrid, Spain:

This isn't a cute little demonstration; it's a global phenomenon. And it was all started by one teenager who refused to accept leaders' excuses for lack of action on climate change.

Kudos to Greta, for starting such an inspiring worldwide movement. Get out of the way, grown-ups. The youth have arrived to save us all.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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Photo by munshots on Unsplash

Last May, the whole world reacted to the murder of George Floyd caught on video by a quick-thinking teenage bystander. We watched the minutes tick by as Derek Chauvin pressed his knee into Floyd's neck. We watched Floyd tell the officers he couldn't breathe and then call out for his mother. We watched him stop talking, stop moving, stop breathing while Derek Chauvin kept on kneeling with his hand in his pocket.

While most of the attention has been on Chauvin's actions in that horrifying video, there were three other police officers involved at the scene.

Three other officers who participated in either helping hold Floyd down or watching as it happened. Three officers who witnessed their colleague murder a man in plain sight, with bystanders begging them to intervene, and doing nothing to stop it. Three officers who didn't even try to resuscitate the man who had stopped breathing right in front of them.

The accountability of those officers has been in question since Derek Chauvin was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and manslaughter in the George Floyd case. Now, a federal grand jury has indicted all four officers, including Chauvin, for willfully violating George Floyd's constitutional rights.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less