Leonardo DiCaprio shocked the fossil fuel industry with a simple but powerful move.
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League of Conservation Voters

Leonardo DiCaprio is essentially a dreamy, human version of Captain Planet.

Dude loves the environment, and he does more than just talk.

He joined in on the People's Climate Change March last fall:


Photo by Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images.

And spoke at the U.S. State Department's conference on ocean conservation:

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Not to mention, he's very generous with his money and time.

And he tends to bring other celebs along on his quest to save the earth:

DiCaprio on stage with Bono at the inaugural Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Gala. Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images for the LDF.

It's safe to say DiCaprio definitely has a love for our wild and wonderful planet. And like many wonderful and giving partners, he's not afraid to splurge a little to show the good ol' earth how much he cares.

DiCaprio is one of thousands who has pledged to stop investing in fossil fuel companies.

The movie star is part of the Divest Invest Coalition, an initiative that encourages individual investors, foundations, and institutions to stop investing in fossil fuels and in businesses that contribute to climate change and instead invest in renewable energy and eco-friendly companies.

DiCaprio at the Divest Invest press event. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

DiCaprio pledged to divest his personal wealth and charitable funds from fossil fuels. He's joined by 2,000 other individuals (including The Hulk) and more than 400 companies and institutions.

Together, their divestment commitments total close to $2.6 trillion!

"Climate change is severely impacting the health of our planet and all of its inhabitants," DiCaprio said in his announcement to the press, "and we must transition to a clean energy economy that does not rely on fossil fuels, the main driver of this global problem."

So where is DiCaprio investing his money instead?

Well, the short answer is pretty simple: in the trash.

Yes, the trash. That trash.

Trash:

Photo by woodleywonderworks/Flickr.

DiCaprio recently invested an undisclosed amount in a company called Rubicon Global, which uses software to connect businesses to waste management companies to help them find cheaper, closer places to haul trash and recycling (think Uber for garbage).

DiCaprio continues to raise funds and awareness for environmental action through his charitable foundation.

His second annual Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation Gala raised $40 million for the group, which boasts four primary areas of focus: ocean and wild land conservation, climate change, and protecting biodiversity.

We have been able to support organizations that are working to solve some of today's most pressing environmental issues. Throughout today, I'll post about a few of them and share the incredible work they do. Want to put a spotlight on our beautiful planet and the things that you do to make a difference? Use #LDFoundation and I'll share a few of my favorites.
A photo posted by Leonardo DiCaprio (@leonardodicaprio) on

So hat's off to you, Leonardo DiCaprio.

Thanks for using your influence to help save the planet and inspiring celebs and us regular folks to do the same. With our powers combined, anything is possible.*


"The power is yours!" GIF from "Captain Planet."

*Except maybe getting you that Oscar. Sorry.

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Researchers at the Center for Countering Digital Hate, a not-for-profit non-governmental organization dedicated to disrupting online hate and misinformation, and the group Anti-Vax Watch performed an analysis of social media posts that included false claims about the COVID-19 vaccines between February 1 and March 16, 2021. Of the disinformation content posted or shared more than 800,000 times, nearly two-thirds could be traced back to just 12 individuals. On Facebook alone, 73% of the false vaccine claims originated from those 12 people.

Dubbed the "Disinformation Dozen," these 12 anti-vaxxers have an outsized influence on social media. According to the CCDH, anti-vaccine accounts have a reach of more than 59 million people. And most of them have been spreading disinformation with impunity.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
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Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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