Jeff Bridges is so perfectly chill he’s literally helping people sleep better.
Angela Weiss/Getty Images.

For 20 years, Jeff Bridges has become synonymous with his “Big Lebowski” character. Instead of running away from it, he’s embraced it both for fans and to do some good in the world.

The creative resume of Jeff Bridges speaks for itself: Academy-Award winning actor, successful musician and producer. But he’s also built an impressive philanthropic track record over the years working in support of a number of great causes, including No Kid Hungry.

This September he even traveled to New York with Ringo Starr and Yoko Ono to recreate Ono and John Lennon's famous "Bed-Ins for Peace" event to raise awareness for No Kid Hungry.


SLEEP CLUB SPOTLIGHT: Come Together NYC Recap

WATCH THE RECAP of Yoko Ono, Ringo Starr, Jeff Bridges and special guests as they get in bed with the Lennon Bus! Wake up and activate!

Posted by Join Sleep Club on Tuesday, September 25, 2018

But in a recent interview, he told Upworthy that living a productive and creative life means making time for rest. That’s why he’s partnered up with a new venture, Sleep Club, to help people sleep smarter and live their waking lives to the fullest.

His Sleeping Tapes went viral. But they were just the beginning.

Back in 2015, Bridges released his album “Sleeping Tapes” during a viral Super Bowl ad. The eclectic album went to #2 on the New Age charts and became a cultural phenomenon.

“It’s totally surprising. Who knew it was going to become this hot topic,” he said of the response. “I was in an experimental mood,” Bridges says with his signature laugh.

But it was far from a joke, raising over $500,000 for charity.

Raising half a million dollars for a great cause? NBD.

He said he plans to take the Sleeping Tapes concept “to the next level” in his collaboration with Sleep Club.

“It’s easy to point at Jeff’s acting, music and photography,” said Sleep Club CEO Brooks Branch. "He comes from a truly place of passion. But what I’m blown away is it’s the same whether he’s working on the most highly profiled film or his charity, or something he’s doing entirely for himself.”

In addition to the Sleeping Tapes, Branch’s company is offering a wide variety of products and experts to help people looking to improve their sleeping habits and learn more about how sleep affects their waking lives.

But there’s literally an equal focus on the site to “Sleep” and “Awake” activities and it’s on the Awake side that Bridges is creating a virtual playground of experts, art and where he’s even started his own blog.

He’s using the platform to introduce the world to people that have inspired him.

During our conversation, Bridges talked about people who have inspired him throughout his life in art, politics and living. He even co-wrote a book on his spiritual practice and meditation.

“It’s kind of surprising,” he says of his practice, which includes meditating on film sets in between scenes, where he can “conjure up some emptiness,” before the camera rolls.

“I was kind of spiritually bent since I was a little kid,” he says of his practice. “When you’re interested in things it starts showing up in your life.”

He says he wants to use his forum on the Sleep Store site to “Get to turn folks on to people who wake you up,” and to let people into the world of individuals who have helped shape his life, including “A whole slew of people” in art, philanthropy, “old friends,” and the “people that worked on the Sleeping Tapes with me.”

So, if you're having trouble getting a good night's rest. Or, if you want to explore new ways of tapping into your creativity during your waking life, rest a little easier knowing Jeff Bridges has got your back.

Photo by  Emma McIntyre/Getty Images.

Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

Keep Reading Show less
Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

Keep Reading Show less