Jeff Bridges is so perfectly chill he’s literally helping people sleep better.
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For 20 years, Jeff Bridges has become synonymous with his “Big Lebowski” character. Instead of running away from it, he’s embraced it both for fans and to do some good in the world.

The creative resume of Jeff Bridges speaks for itself: Academy-Award winning actor, successful musician and producer. But he’s also built an impressive philanthropic track record over the years working in support of a number of great causes, including No Kid Hungry.

This September he even traveled to New York with Ringo Starr and Yoko Ono to recreate Ono and John Lennon's famous "Bed-Ins for Peace" event to raise awareness for No Kid Hungry.


SLEEP CLUB SPOTLIGHT: Come Together NYC Recap

WATCH THE RECAP of Yoko Ono, Ringo Starr, Jeff Bridges and special guests as they get in bed with the Lennon Bus! Wake up and activate!

Posted by Join Sleep Club on Tuesday, September 25, 2018

But in a recent interview, he told Upworthy that living a productive and creative life means making time for rest. That’s why he’s partnered up with a new venture, Sleep Club, to help people sleep smarter and live their waking lives to the fullest.

His Sleeping Tapes went viral. But they were just the beginning.

Back in 2015, Bridges released his album “Sleeping Tapes” during a viral Super Bowl ad. The eclectic album went to #2 on the New Age charts and became a cultural phenomenon.

“It’s totally surprising. Who knew it was going to become this hot topic,” he said of the response. “I was in an experimental mood,” Bridges says with his signature laugh.

But it was far from a joke, raising over $500,000 for charity.

Raising half a million dollars for a great cause? NBD.

He said he plans to take the Sleeping Tapes concept “to the next level” in his collaboration with Sleep Club.

“It’s easy to point at Jeff’s acting, music and photography,” said Sleep Club CEO Brooks Branch. "He comes from a truly place of passion. But what I’m blown away is it’s the same whether he’s working on the most highly profiled film or his charity, or something he’s doing entirely for himself.”

In addition to the Sleeping Tapes, Branch’s company is offering a wide variety of products and experts to help people looking to improve their sleeping habits and learn more about how sleep affects their waking lives.

But there’s literally an equal focus on the site to “Sleep” and “Awake” activities and it’s on the Awake side that Bridges is creating a virtual playground of experts, art and where he’s even started his own blog.

He’s using the platform to introduce the world to people that have inspired him.

During our conversation, Bridges talked about people who have inspired him throughout his life in art, politics and living. He even co-wrote a book on his spiritual practice and meditation.

“It’s kind of surprising,” he says of his practice, which includes meditating on film sets in between scenes, where he can “conjure up some emptiness,” before the camera rolls.

“I was kind of spiritually bent since I was a little kid,” he says of his practice. “When you’re interested in things it starts showing up in your life.”

He says he wants to use his forum on the Sleep Store site to “Get to turn folks on to people who wake you up,” and to let people into the world of individuals who have helped shape his life, including “A whole slew of people” in art, philanthropy, “old friends,” and the “people that worked on the Sleeping Tapes with me.”

So, if you're having trouble getting a good night's rest. Or, if you want to explore new ways of tapping into your creativity during your waking life, rest a little easier knowing Jeff Bridges has got your back.

Photo by  Emma McIntyre/Getty Images.

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Courtesy of Creative Commons
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"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

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Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

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