Heroes

It's a miracle that they keep their clothes on all day, but would you?

Everyone enjoys a little sun now andagain. But the stifling, way-past-summer, folks-can't-move kind of heat is just not cool (literally).

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Unilever and the United Nations

I'm not talking about some far-off planet in outerspace.

Extreme heat is right in our own backyards.


Like in Wisconsin, where "It's an all-you-can-heat buffet from May to October, and senior citizen discount is every day."

The main dude who "gets it " is a teenager.

"Neighborhoods are ovens with windows, and as the knob on global warming increases, lives are preheated until the soul soufflés."

He has all the right words.

"Compressed living complexes circulate heat and cause compressed feelings to converge upon our neighbors in the hood. So that 90% release of excess body heat talked about in science class is contributing to our local temperature rising."

Because climate change isn't just happening to him.

It's happening to all the people around him. "Heat affects the elderly more than it does us. Their lungs resemble the Dow Exchange, rises and drops until they crash."

His words and observations don't stop there. Click below and listen to what else he's got to say:

What a compelling poem, right?

If you're hungry for real-time facts, check out this change-before-your-very-own-eyes interactive map.

It shows the temperatures of the past while predicting how climate change will affect Wisconsin's landscape in the future. Interesting, but kind of scary.

Let's Do More Together

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To support this effort and other programs like it, all you have to do is keep doing what you're doing — like shopping for laundry detergent. Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

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Anyone who has spent any time around dogs knows that fireworks can be a jarring experience. The fact that they are in a shelter with the uncertainty of not having a home and being caged, combines for an understandably anxious situation. Santiago mentions to azcentral.com, that sometimes the pets can get so stressed out that they can jump out of windows or dig under fences, which isn't healthy for their psyche. The third annual Calm the Canines event is sponsored by Maricopa County Animal Care and Control with founder Santiago in Arizona. They comfort animals during these worrisome times.


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