If you're a fan of the stage and lamenting the lack of theater performances for the foreseeable future, here's some good news.

Famed Broadway musical writer Andrew Lloyd Webber shared a video announcing that Universal is launching a new YouTube channel dedicated to stage-to-screen musicals. The channel is called "The Shows Must Go On," and it will air a different show every Friday—but just for 48 hours.



The first musical, airing April 3, will be Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, starring Donny Osmond and Joan Collins. Next week, for Good Friday April 10, the channel will air Jesus Christ Superstar. The rest of the schedule will be announced at a later time.

With theater ticket prices out of the reach of many—even when we're not in the midst of a global pandemic—this is a great opportunity to see a stage production for free. You can find the YouTube channel here.

Thanks, Universal!

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Bill Gates, billionaire and founder of Microsoft, is pointing the finger at social media companies like Facebook and Twitter for spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

In an interview with Fast Company, Gates said: "Can the social media companies be more helpful on these issues? What creativity do we have?" Sadly, the digital tools probably have been a net contributor to spreading what I consider to be crazy ideas."

According to Gates, crazy ideas aren't just limited to the internet. They are going beyond that. He doesn't see the logic behind not protecting yourself and others from coronavirus."Not wearing masks is hard to understand, because it is not that bothersome," he explained. "It is not expensive and yet some people feel it is a sign of freedom or something, despite risk of infecting people."


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