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Joy

Dad's sweet video shows the 'unsung benefits' of reliving his childhood with his son

Nostalgic, relatable and poignant all at the same time.

parenting, kids, fatherhood
@parental_with_me/TikTok

"It's awesome"

There comes a point in every person’s life when the toys, games, fantasy books, cartoons, all start to take up less space in our lives. Partially because of naturally changing interests, and also due to the responsibilities of adulthood setting in.

But then when we have kids, suddenly we are transported back to this magical time when play ruled our lives.

For a dad named Andrew, this is one of the biggest “unsung benefits” of parenthood, and he is ready to sing its praises.

“You literally get to relive your childhood through play with them,” Andrew says as he lists some of his favorite staples, once only memories and now current pastimes with his son.

Things like playing with Play-Doh (can’t you instantly recall that distinct Play-doh smell?), shooting How Wheels cars down a plastic track, enjoying a swing set, and watching Pokémon.

Not only does it bring out his own inner child, Andrew, reflects, it also helps him connect with his son over shared interests.

“You get to watch this person that’s never experienced this thing that you loved start to love it themselves,” he reflects. “It’s awesome.”

@parental_with_me It’s a daily dose of nostalgia shared with little humans you love #dadtok #dadtoks #parentsoftiktok #parenting #dadlife #momtok #momsoftiktok #dadsoftiktok #momlife @LEGO @Play-Doh @Hot Wheels ♬ Lofi Hip Hop - Danyko Beats Kream

Andrew’s video soon went viral on TikTok, and other parents couldn't help but share their own experiences of these “unsing benefits.”

“Halloween, Christmas, zoos, children’s museums, arcade, fireworks, everything that maybe lost a little magic as an adult gets all the magic back,” one person wrote.

Another added, “When my husband learned our two-year-old is in LOVE with Pokémon, never seen this man more happy and excited!”

One person even illustrated how the experience can be very healing for those whose parents never actually played with them, writing, , “Honestly aside from the OCCASIONAL game of monopoly as a family I don’t really remember my parents playing with me. My son will know different.”

In a follow-up video, Andrews noted that while of course these activities can be enjoyed for folks who wish to remain childless, the point he was trying to make is that there’s a different flavor of bliss that happens through the lens of being a parent.

@parental_with_me Replying to @Bingelyte Some quick thoughts on the ‘i can play all these as an adult without a kid’ crowd #dadtok #dadtoks #parentsoftiktok #parenting #dadlife #momtok #momsoftiktok #momsoftiktok #dadsoftiktok #momlife ♬ original sound - Andrew

“It's less about how you're feeling about playing it as an adult and it's more about seeing them and how much they enjoy it and being a part of that experience for them” he said.

There is something to be said about sharing the experience with little humans who view the world in such a different way, which reminds us not only of what pure innocence actually feels like, but the divine gift of harboring the next generation of humanity. That’s undeniably special.

Here’s to all of us having the opportunity to see through the eyes of a child again. Be it through our own children, through nieces and nephews, through kids groups, or simply by busting out the toys without a second glance.

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