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Joy

'Baby Holly' found alive and reunited with her family 40 years after parents' murder

An amazing end to a horrible event.

Baby Holly; missing person

Baby Holly found alive.

Upworthy strives to bring you the most uplifting stories out there, so when we saw KHOU broke the story about this unique reunion, we had to share. There's no way to prepare for tragedy to strike and there is no rulebook on how to prepare a child to grow up without their parents. It's a situation that no one wants to live through but a baby girl's life was forever changed before she made it to her second birthday. Missing for 40 years, “Baby Holly,” the daughter of a couple found murdered in 1981, has been reunited with her family. The untimely deaths of the couple led to a multidecade search for the suspect and the couple’s missing daughter. A new Cold Case and Missing Persons Unit with the Texas Attorney General's Office worked across state lines to locate the missing child, now a mother of five.


This story is one born of tragedy but ends in the most hope filling way possible. Dean and Tina Linn Clouse were just like many young couples—out on their own raising their young daughter. But on January 12, 1981, their little family would be met with tragedy and Holly disappeared. The couple was found in a remote part of Houston and remained unidentified until October 2021 using advanced DNA techniques underwritten by audiochuck. Amazingly enough, with the help of three states and combing missing persons records, the Clouses's daughter was located in Oklahoma.

A connection to family is important for a lot of people and finally after nearly a half century, the missing baby was able to be reunited with her biological family. According to KHOU, the Office of the Attorney General Senior Counsel Mindy Montford and Det. Craig Holloman with the Lewisville Police Department visited Holly’s workplace on June 7, which would’ve been her father’s 63rd birthday, to inform her that she was missing “Baby Holly.” Hours after the police informed her of her identity, she was reunited with both sides of her family online.

In the early '80s and '90s there wasn't the technology available today to aid in the search for missing children, and this likely hindered the search for Holly. Before she was located, FHD Forensics started the Hope for Holly DNA Project to hold the genetic profiles of some of Holly’s family members. This project helped connect the missing pieces to locate the missing child of the Clouses. Holly’s aunt, Cheryl Clouse, told KHOU's Xavier Walton, who first reported on the story, “The whole family slept well last night. The Hope For Holly Project was a success thanks to the Texas Cold Case Unit.”

The relief the family has felt since finding Holly is clear. Sherry Green, Holly’s maternal aunt, told KHOU, “I believe Tina is finally resting in peace knowing Holly is reuniting with her family.” While the family is still preoccupied with this joyous development and surely awaiting the chance to meet Holly in person with the help of The Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the agencies involved are also celebrating the culmination of months of hard work. Founder of FHD Forensics and genealogist Allison Peacock explained to KHOU, “They’ve spent the past six months with me digging through records, gathering photos for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children’s age progression portrait, and documenting memories of Holly and her parents in an effort to help law enforcement,” when praising the family for never giving up.

This story is truly one of determination, technology and hope meeting to help bring a missing child back to her family. While the mystery of who murdered Holly’s parents still remains unsolved, the intense and effective work of this newly formed cold case unit not only gives continued hope to the relatives of the Clouses, but hope to other families who may still be waiting on answers.

Anyone with information about the disappearance and murder of Dean “Junior” Clouse and his wife, Tina Linn Clouse, should contact Sgt. Rachel Kading at the Texas Office of the Attorney General’s Cold Case and Missing Persons Unit at coldcaseunit@oag.texas.gov or 512-936-0742.

Nature

Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave that’s been closed for 70 years

You can only access the cave from the basement of the home and it’s open for business.

This Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave.

Have you ever seen something in a movie or online and thought, "That's totally fake," only to find out it's absolutely a real thing? That's sort of how this house in Pennsylvania comes across. It just seems too fantastical to be real, and yet somehow it actually exists.

The home sits between Greencastle and Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and houses a pretty unique public secret. There's a cave in the basement. Not a man cave or a basement that makes you feel like you're in a cave, but an actual cave that you can't get to unless you go through the house.

Turns out the cave was discovered in the 1830s on the land of John Coffey, according to Uncovering PA, but the story of how it was found is unclear. People would climb down into the cave to explore occasionally until the land was leased about 100 years later and a small structure was built over the cave opening.

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Health

This company makes it easier than ever to enjoy guilt-free fairly traded coffee

Thanks to Lifeboost, good coffee can be good for everyone.

Unsplash

Lifeboost coffee

Americans love coffee. Like, we really, seriously, truly love it. According to one recent survey, 75 percent of U.S. adults drink coffee at least occasionally, while 53 percent—about 110 million people—drink it every single day. For some, coffee is an essential part of their morning ritual. For others, it’s something they enjoy when they hit the proverbial wall in the late afternoon. But either way, millions of people use coffee to boost energy, focus, and productivity.


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Pop Culture

13-year-old ventriloquist sings incredible, sassy version of 'You Don't Own Me' on 'AGT'

Ana-Maria Mărgean only started her hobby in 2020 and is already wowing audiences on "America's Got Talent."

America's Got Talent/Youtube

Ana-Maria Mărgean singing "You Don't Own Me" on "America's Got Talent"

It’s not every day a ventriloquist act is so jaw-dropping that it has to be seen to be believed. But when it does happen, it’s usually on “America’s Got Talent.”

Ana-Maria Mărgean was only 11 years old when she first took to the stage on “Romania’s Got Talent” to show off her ventriloquism skills, an act inspired by videos of fellow ventriloquist and “America’s Got Talent” Season 2 champion Terry Fator.

Using puppets built for her by her parents, the young performer tirelessly spent her quarantine time in 2020 learning how to bring them to life, which led to her receiving a Golden Buzzer and eventually winning the entire series in Romania.

Mărgean is now 13 and a competitor on this season of “America’s Got Talent: All-Stars,” hoping to be crowned the winner and perform her own show in Vegas, just like her hero Fator.

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Pop Culture

Linda Ronstadt's 1970's ballad is a chart-topping hit once again thanks to 'The Last of Us'

The iconic 70s song "Long, Long Time" was an integral part of an unforgettable episode that fans are calling a masterpiece.

Linda Ronstadt (left), Nick Offerman and Murray Bartlett (right)

HBO’s emotional third episode of the zombie series “The Last Of Us” became an instant favorite among fans, thanks in no small part to Linda Ronstadt’s late 1970s ballad, “Long, Long Time.”

Using the song as the episode’s title, “Long, Long Time,” moves away from the show’s main plot to instead focus on a heartbreakingly beautiful love story between Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), from its endearing start all the way to its bittersweet end.

The song makes its first appearance during the initial stages of Bill and Frank’s romance as they play the tune on the piano, just before they share their first kiss.

We see their entire lives together play out—one of closeness, devotion, and savoring homegrown strawberries—until they meet their end. The song then plays on the radio, bringing the bottle episode to a poignant close.

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Joy

34-year-old man is learning to read on TikTok in series of motivational videos

His reading skills have improved so much that he plans to read 100 books this year.

@oliverspeaks1/TikTok

Oliver James is the biggest star on BookTok.

With over 125,000 followers, 34-year-old Oliver James is a star in the BookTok community. And it all started with a very simple goal: Learn to read.

For most kids, school is a place where they can develop a relationship with learning in a safe environment. For James, school was the opposite. Growing up with learning and behavior disabilities subjected him to abusive teaching practices in special education, which, of course, did nothing to help.

"The special education system at the time was more focused on behavioral than educating," he told Good Morning America. "So they spent a lotta time restraining us, a lotta time disciplining us, a lotta times putting us in positions to kinda shape us to just not act out in class."

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Pop Culture

Buffy Sainte-Marie shares what led to her openly breastfeeding on 'Sesame Street' in 1977

The way she explained to Big Bird what she was doing is still an all-time great example.

"Sesame Street" taught kids about life in addition to letters and numbers.

In 1977, singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie did something revolutionary: She fed her baby on Sesame Street.

The Indigenous Canadian-Ameican singer-songwriter wasn't doing anything millions of other mothers hadn't done—she was simply feeding her baby. But the fact that she was breastfeeding him was significant since breastfeeding in the United States hit an all-time low in 1971 and was just starting to make a comeback. The fact that she did it openly on a children's television program was even more notable, since "What if children see?" has been a key pearl clutch for people who criticize breastfeeding in public.

But the most remarkable thing about the "Sesame Street" segment was the lovely interchange between Big Bird and Sainte-Marie when he asked her what she was doing.

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