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Millennial argues Boomer generation 'anxiety-at-you' parenting language is bad for kids

“The commonly accepted stereotype of a loving mom is the worrywart. Women don't recognize it as a problem.”

anxiety, bommer parents, millenial parents

Gabi Day is tired of managing her mother's anxiety.

Beauty product influencer Gabi Day shared a personal problem she was going through as a parent and daughter on TikTok, and resonated with many fellow Millennials. Her mother, who watches her 18-month-old twins, expresses her love for her family through demonstrative anxiety.

Day believes that this personality trait made her an anxious person, and she doesn’t want it passed on to her children.

“Does anyone else have a Boomer mom whose primary love language is anxiety-at-you?” she asked her followers. She added that her mother was always “reactive,” “nervous,” and “anxious” throughout her childhood. Now, when her kids are playing and aren’t in any danger, her mother is still on edge. “She's immediately like gasping and just really like exaggerated physical reactions, and then, of course, that kind of startles my kid,” Day said.


“Again, I know that this comes from a place of care. It's just a lot,” she continued.

@itsgabiday

It comes from a place of love but it is exhausting 🫠😬 #millennialmomsoftiktok #boomergrandma #reparenting #gentleparenting

To further complicate things, Day’s mother believes this constant expression of anxiety is her love language and shows she cares. She can’t understand why it causes such problems within her family.

“The flip side of this is she sees me actively trying to be the calm in the room, model emotional regulation, breathe through things being regulated and she looks at me confused. As if me not anxiety-at-ing my children somehow means that I don't care about them enough,” she revealed.

The post resonated with a lot of people in the comments.

"My mom thinks that her anxiety is proof of her love. The more she wrings her hands, the more she loves you," Lori wrote. "I think the commonly accepted stereotype of a loving mom is the worrywort. Women don't recognize it as a problem," Claire added.

Can he be the father?

The presumed father of a newborn baby was skeptical of his paternity after the baby girl was born with blonde hair and blue eyes. He and his wife of two years have brown hair and brown eyes, so he thought there was no chance it was his child.

The wife reassured her husband that they could have a blonde-haired, blue-eyed baby and that, quite often, a baby’s hair and eye color can change over time.

But the husband “freaked out at this and refused to listen,” the wife wrote in a viral post on Reddit’s AITA page. Instead, he “demanded a paternity test and threatened to divorce me if I didn’t comply, so I did.”

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@antidietpilot/TikTok

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