Awesome doesn't begin to describe this rare ultra-HD aerial footage of the Himalayas.
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Universal Pictures: Everest

You have three seconds to think of a mountain range more beautiful and majestic than the Himalayas.

Three...


Image by Teton Gravity Research.

Two...

Image by Teton Gravity Research.

Couldn't do it could you?

Of course you couldn't. That was an impossible task because...

The Himalayas are the friggin' best.

You don't have to agree with me — just watch this beautiful footage from Teton Gravity Research. But if you're still unconvinced, scroll down for four excellent reasons this mountain range ... rocks. (Get it? I'm sorry.)

1. The Himalayan range is small but mighty.

Spanning 1,500 miles, the mountain range stretches across the borders of Pakistan, China, India, Nepal, Afghanistan, and Bhutan. Other ranges like the Rockies and the Andes dwarf the Himalayas in length, but they make up for it in altitude ... in a major way.

Image by Teton Gravity Research.

2. The Himalayas are home to the (probably) most famous mountain in the world.

It's so big, it became a metaphor for insurmountable tasks. Mt. Everest is 29,029 feet, making it the highest point on Earth from sea level.

Image by Teton Gravity Research.

In fact, the Nepalese call Everest "Sagarmatha," which translates to mean "mother of the universe."

But Everest doesn't stand alone. The Himalayas are home to some of the highest peaks on the planet.

3. Despite appearing positively frosty, parts of the Himalayas are considered a tropical forest!

Say what?!

Image by Teton Gravity Research.

Yes, Himalaya is Sanskrit for "abode of snow," but the ecology of the region is very complex. Grasslands, shrubs, and broadleaf tropical plants all thrive in different parts of the mountain range, along with hundreds of species of birds and wildlife.


Image by Teton Gravity Research.

And finally. As if you needed a reminder.

4. Simply put: They're stunning.

From peak to peak, these are some of the most majestic natural wonders on earth.

Look at it. F@%*ing look at it! GIF from Teton Gravity Research.

Teton Gravity Research released the above jaw-dropping, awe-inspiring, ultra-HD aerial footage of the Himalayas. They filmed the shots from a helicopter soaring anywhere from 4,600 to 24,000 feet up. Capturing the majestic peaks literally took their breath away, as the crew had to rely on supplemental oxygen to get some of the awe-inspiring shots.

It's f@%*ing awesome. And you should see it for yourself. Thankfully, you don't have to travel thousands of miles. All you gotta do is scroll up and press play!

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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