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Alabama woman who married her stepbrother and has 2 kids shares their crazy love story

“It happens more than people would think! Glad I’m not alone!”

lindsay brown, married stepsiblings, alabama

Lindsay and Caleb have an interesting history together.

In a story that would make a fantastic, albeit long, country song, Lindsay Brown and her husband Cade of Alabama have found love even though they are stepsiblings who were once banned from seeing each other by their parents.

Lindsay shared the dramatic saga on TikTok, where she has nearly 3,000 followers.

It all began in 2007 when Linday was 14 and Cade was 16, and the couple would secretly meet at her house. However, on the fourth night they were together, Lindsay’s mother walked in on them and Cade had to run out of the house in his birthday suit.

"He grabbed his keys, his phone, he did not grab his clothes,” Lindsay said in a TikTok post. “He ran through the yard, up the street to his truck naked. Then he drove home and snuck in his house naked and his parents never knew any of that happened."


After the incident, Lindsay’s mom reached out to Cade’s parents, who agreed the two shouldn’t see each other. The teens didn’t have a big problem with the ban, mainly because Cade had a girlfriend at the time.

@girl_meets_bro

Timing is everything! #lovestory #foryoupage #marriage #hubby #real #truestory

Six years later, Lindsay was driving to a baseball game in Atlanta with her boyfriend and received a direct message on Facebook from Cade. The two began talking, and a week or two later, she went to see him and left her boyfriend.

This development didn’t go over well with Lindsay’s mom because Cade had a “troubled” life after high school, and she didn’t want her involved in the chaos. But that didn’t stop the two from spending time together. Eventually, Lindsay’s mom drove up to Cade’s father’s house, where the two stayed, to talk some sense into her.

The mother and Cade’s dad, Rusty, were both single and began talking “for a long time.”

Soon enough, Cade got into trouble and was incarcerated for a year. Wanting to start a new life, Lindsay joined the Air Force in Texas, but that didn't keep them apart for long. Lindsay began visiting Cade in prison and the two rekindled their love. At the same time, their parents started dating, and things were getting “hot and heavy” between them.

@girl_meets_bro

Replying to @toddbrayfield415 #marriage #trending #viral #foryoupage #momsoftiktok #couplegoals #girlsbelike

When Cade got out in 2014, the couple moved in together, and after a few weeks, they "went up the road to the courthouse" and got married. Cade says it was out of "boredom." A little more than a year later, their parents also married, making Cade and Linday stepsiblings.

For the most part, things have gone well for the couple and their parents. "Our family has just blended real well, we're all happy,” Lindsay said. “They never would have got married if it wasn't for us."

After sharing their story, Lindsay learned that this type of family arrangement is more common than most people think. “It happened to my brother and his wife! They got married, and then our dad married her mom like 5 years later. best sister in law/step sister ever,” Spirit Hager wrote. “I know someone who married a guy she was with for years then years later his dad and her mom married, so same situation,” Skiddermama_748h added.

@girl_meets_bro

Grand Finale! #momsoftiktok #couplegoals #storytime

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From political science to joining the fight against cancer: How one woman found her passion

An unexpected pivot to project management expanded Krystal Brady's idea of what it means to make a positive impact.

Krystal Brady/PMI

Krystal Brady utilizes her project management skills to help advance cancer research and advocacy.

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Cancer impacts nearly everyone’s life in one way or another, and thankfully, we’re learning more about treatment and prevention every day. Individuals and organizations dedicated to fighting cancer and promising research from scientists are often front and center, but we don’t always see the people working behind the scenes to make the fight possible.

People like Krystal Brady.

While studying political science in college, Brady envisioned her future self in public office. She never dreamed she’d build a successful career in the world of oncology, helping cancer researchers, doctors and advocates continue battling cancer, but more efficiently.

Brady’s journey to oncology began with a seasonal job at a small publishing company, which helped pay for college and awakened her love for managing projects. Now, 15 years later, she’s serving as director of digital experience and strategy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which she describes as “the perfect place to pair my love of project management and desire to make positive change in the world.”

As a project manager, Brady helps make big ideas for the improvement of diagnosing and treating cancer a reality. She is responsible for driving the critical projects that impact the lives of cancer researchers, doctors, and patients.

“I tell people that my job is part toolbox, part glue,” says Brady. “Being a project manager means being responsible for understanding the details of a project, knowing what tools or resources you need to execute the project, and facilitating the flow of that work to the best outcome possible. That means promoting communication, partnership, and ownership among the team for the project.”

At its heart, Brady’s project management work is about helping people. One of the big projects Brady is currently working on is ASCO’s digital transformation, which includes upgrading systems and applications to help streamline and personalize oncologists’ online experience so they can access the right resources more quickly. Whether you are managing humans or machines, there’s an extraordinary need for workers with the skillset to harness new technology and solve problems.

The digital transformation project also includes preparing for the use of emerging technologies such as generative AI to help them in their research and practices.

“Most importantly, it lays the groundwork for us to make a meaningful impact at the point of care, giving the oncologist and patient the absolute latest recommendations or guidelines for care for that specific patient or case, allowing the doctor to spend more time with their patients and less time on paperwork,” Brady says.

In today’s fast-changing, quickly advancing world, project management is perhaps more valuable than ever. After discovering her love for it, Brady earned her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification through Project Management Institute (PMI)—the premier professional organization for project managers with chapters all over the world—which she says gave her an edge over other candidates when she applied for her job at ASCO.

“The knowledge I gained in preparing for the PMP exam serves me every day in my role,” Brady says. “What I did not expect and have truly come to value is the PMI network as well – finding like-minded individuals, opportunities for continuous learning, and the ability to volunteer and give back.”

PMI’s growing community – including more than 300 chapters globally – serves as a place for project managers and individuals who use project management skills to learn and grow through events, online resources, and certification programs.

While people often think of project management in the context of corporate careers, all industries and organizations need project managers, making it a great career for those who want to elevate our world through non-profits or other service-oriented fields.

“Project management makes a difference by focusing on efficiency and outcomes, making us all a little better at what we do,” says Brady. “In almost every industry, understanding how to do our work more effectively and efficiently means more value to our customers, and the world at large, at an increased pace.”

Project management is also a stable career path in high demand as shown by PMI research, which found that the global economy will need 25 million more project managers by 2030 and that the median salary for project managers in the US has grown to $120K.

If you’d like to learn more about careers in project management, PMI has resources to help you get started or prove your proficiency, including its entry-level Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification program. For those interested in pursuing a project management career to make a difference, it could be your first step.
via Taylor Skaff/Unsplash and Kenny Eliason/Unsplash

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