Watch the Great Barrier Reef come to life in this breathtaking video.

The Great Barrier Reef is gorgeous — and vital to our planet.

That feeling when you see something so mind-boggling cool it's difficult to believe it actually exists?

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Like, exits in the real world and not a James Cameron movie?


Yeah, I'm feeling that pretty hard right now.

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This isn't footage taken from outer space or a Hollywood studio.

It was captured in Australia's Great Barrier Reef by the (brilliant) team at BioQuest Studios.

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You can check out their amazing video, "Slow Life," below.

The Great Barrier Reef is unlike any other in the world.

Comprised of more than 3,000 smaller reef systems and hundreds of islands, the Great Barrier Reef is the largest reef in the world. It covers over 1,400 miles! That's more than the distance between New York City and Miami, Florida, FYI.

The reef is the only living thing visible from space.

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National Geographic explains perfectly why it's truly such an amazing sight to see:

The most riveting sight of all — and the main reason for World Heritage status — is the vast expanse of coral, from staghorn stalks and wave-smoothed plates to mitt-shaped boulders draped with nubby brown corals as leathery as saddles. Soft corals top hard ones, algae and sponges paint the rocks, and every crevice is a creature's home. The biology, like the reef, transforms from the north—where the reef began—to the south. The shifting menagerie is unmatched in the world.

The Great Barrier Reef is more than just beautiful, though — it's home to an absurd amount of species.

And that's all the more reason to fight for its protection.

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The Great Barrier Reef hosts 1,800 species of fish, 125 types of sharks, and 5,000 various mollusks, according to National Geographic. The outlet perfectly described how that — although


The reef's sheer diversity is part of what makes it great. It hosts 5,000 types of mollusks, 1,800 species of fish, 125 kinds of sharks, and innumerable miniature organisms. But the most riveting sight of all—and the main reason for World Heritage status—is the vast expanse of coral, from staghorn stalks and wave-smoothed plates to mitt-shaped boulders draped with nubby brown corals as leathery as saddles. Soft corals top hard ones, algae and sponges paint the rocks, and every crevice is a creature's home. The biology, like the reef, transforms from the north—where the reef began—to the south. The shifting menagerie is unmatched in the world.


Closing

Closing


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Youtube

Flowers are a great way to express your feelings for someone. Red roses say, "I love you," but a whole garden of pink flowers screams it. One husband took the romantic gesture of getting your wife flowers to the next level.

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Whenever someone's words or behavior are called out as racist, a few predictable responses always follow. One is to see the word "racist" as a vicious personal attack. Two is to vehemently deny that whatever was said or done was racist. And three is to pull out the dictionary definition of racism to prove that the words or behavior weren't racist.

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Since "racism" is such a loaded term for many people, let's look at such limitations through a different complex word. Let's take "anxiety." According to Merriam-Webster, "anxiety" is defined as "apprehensive uneasiness or nervousness, usually over an impending or anticipated ill."

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If you're a woman and you want to be a CEO, you should probably think about changing your name to "Jeffrey" or "Michael." Or possibly even "Michael Jeffreys" or "Jeffrey Michaels."

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