To get love, you give love. Let a woman from San Francisco show you how she does it.

Shannon Weber knows a thing or two about the power of a simple love note.

Ah, love.

GIF via Disney/Pixar's "Up."


Hugs. Gifts. Snuggles. High fives. Smiles. It's often simple gestures that have the power to truly make a person feel special, important, remembered, appreciated.

For Shannon Weber, it all started with a simple love note on a fridge.

A mom of three, Shannon wanted her kids to have a little reminder of her love all the time, so she stuck a note on her fridge. Seeing it every day made her (and her kids!) feel so great that she started placing love notes all over town; she wanted others to feel the same amazing positive mojo. "I feel alive when I do it. I feel connected to myself, to my kids, to the greater world."

Images by Shannon Weber, used with permission.

It's been four years since Shannon's kitchen note, and her movement has grown.

It's in every ZIP code of San Francisco thanks to a grant from the Awesome Foundation, and love notes are now a part of events at schools, street fairs, and Maker Faires. Participants write love notes and create large "Public Displays of Affection" for all to enjoy. It's public art with a purpose, and for Shannon, it's like a giant love affair with the universe.


Though she started solo, leaving love notes is now a family (and friends) affair.

Shannon and her three kids often go out undercover at night to leave notes around town so others will wake to a happy surprise.

Image via The Talking Fly.

The love has even expanded beyond San Fransisco to the likes of New York City, Utah, and Washington D.C. Shannon leaves a little piece of her heart wherever she goes.

Shannon's love notes bring happiness and comfort to those who see them — loved ones and strangers alike.

Recently Shannon was on a work trip in Washington, D.C., and was feeling some "mom guilt." Her son texted her a photo of one of her signs that he found while out on a walk, and that "You Rock" sign created a shared experience for them, even though they were thousands of miles apart. It lifted Shannon's spirits and connected mother and son.


Image via Shannon Weber.

One of Shannon's most profound experiences with her signs came from the parents of a 22-year-old who died in a freak car accident under an overpass in San Francisco. When these grieving parents went to the scene to look for evidence, they found one of Shannon's signs hanging there. It proclaimed boldly, "There Is No One Like You." It was a powerful reminder of their son's love.


Image via Shannon Weber.

The love continues to spread — and you can help.

Love is important. Everyone wants to feel loved and be part of something greater than themselves. It's ingrained in the human condition. Shannon knows that love has healing juju and the power to make a community stronger, so she's out there, making sure people feel loved.

"This experience of taking love or getting love from somewhere ... you have the capacity or the bandwidth to give love somewhere else."

For more of Shannon's story, check out this video from The Talking Fly:

Want to start a guerrilla-style love-fest of notes in your little corner of the world? Shannon has made it easy with printable templates on her website. Go forth, share love.

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