Tired of hearing how humans have destroyed the planet? You're in for a surprise with this clip.

"You're destroying the planet!"

"Humanity has ruined the Earth."

Sooner or later, we humans all probably heard about what *we* have been doing wrong for the environment.

While there *are* many things humans need to fix about the environment, mentally flogging ourselves isn't helpful either. And, sometimes, we need to acknowledge the good so that we can have the drive to keep making things better.

"But wait," you might be asking. "What HAVE we even done better?"

Here's what humanity did in 2014:

1. Put pressure on Lego to end its partnership with Shell


Shell was drilling a lot in the Arctic and hurting it, and Lego was helping to promote Shell. Now they are not, and everything is awesome again.

2. Got many big companies, like Colgate and Nestle, to promise to buy ethical palm oil

Many companies acquire palm oil that literally displaces people from their homes. Companies agreeing to get palm oil that won't screw up people's lives is wonderful news.

3. Convinced Oriental & Pacific to stop its harmful tuna-catching practices

This means fewer sharks, turtles, and other marine animals being strangled by nets.

4. Showed up for polar bears (and the Arctic)

Polar bears need Arctic ice to survive. Drilling in the Arctic messes with their livelihood. If they have no ice, they have nowhere to sleep or rest, among other things! Fortunately, 6 million people have signed up to put a stop to this.

And so, so, so much more. Watch this video to find out what.

Note: While I understand it's important to not simply pat ourselves on the back and leave it at that, I value the importance to realizing how far we've come and how easily we can become the solution instead of the damage.

If you believe in the power of humanity to be harnessed for good, share this post.

Courtesy of Back on My Feet
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