Tired of hearing how humans have destroyed the planet? You're in for a surprise with this clip.

"You're destroying the planet!"

"Humanity has ruined the Earth."

Sooner or later, we humans all probably heard about what *we* have been doing wrong for the environment.

While there *are* many things humans need to fix about the environment, mentally flogging ourselves isn't helpful either. And, sometimes, we need to acknowledge the good so that we can have the drive to keep making things better.

"But wait," you might be asking. "What HAVE we even done better?"

Here's what humanity did in 2014:

1. Put pressure on Lego to end its partnership with Shell


Shell was drilling a lot in the Arctic and hurting it, and Lego was helping to promote Shell. Now they are not, and everything is awesome again.

2. Got many big companies, like Colgate and Nestle, to promise to buy ethical palm oil

Many companies acquire palm oil that literally displaces people from their homes. Companies agreeing to get palm oil that won't screw up people's lives is wonderful news.

3. Convinced Oriental & Pacific to stop its harmful tuna-catching practices

This means fewer sharks, turtles, and other marine animals being strangled by nets.

4. Showed up for polar bears (and the Arctic)

Polar bears need Arctic ice to survive. Drilling in the Arctic messes with their livelihood. If they have no ice, they have nowhere to sleep or rest, among other things! Fortunately, 6 million people have signed up to put a stop to this.

And so, so, so much more. Watch this video to find out what.

Note: While I understand it's important to not simply pat ourselves on the back and leave it at that, I value the importance to realizing how far we've come and how easily we can become the solution instead of the damage.

If you believe in the power of humanity to be harnessed for good, share this post.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less
Images via YouTube and Takahiro Kyono

Adam Barrett covers 'God Only Knows' co-written by Brian Wilson

Adam Barrett has been steadily building a fan base on YouTube with his acoustic guitar covers of iconic songs from musicians and bands like The Beatles, The Cure and Oasis.

Last year, Barrett uploaded a cover of The Beach Boys song "God Only Knows," from their iconic Pet Sounds album. It's a song so good that Paul McCartney once called it the "greatest song ever written" and has repeatedly praised it over the years, including in 2007 when he performed the song live with Wilson.

Keep Reading Show less
True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."