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They're Just A Bunch Of Little Doodles In A Kid's Notebook. So Why Is It So Upsetting?

Note: This #UpChat has concluded, but don't worry! You can check out our recap of the discussion below and here.This might not be news for some of you. For others, this might be the first time you've ever seen the facts on this issue. But this is real: Too many kids in the United States go hungry each and every day. And that's just incredibly messed up.So if you're as upset as I was after seeing these stats and you want to know how you can help, why not check out our #UpChat on child hunger on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 3 p.m. ET? We're talking solutions with our friends Unilever Project Sunlight and Feeding America, but, you know, only if you've got the time for a totally enlightening hour-long chat on Twitter. Wanna know more? The details are after the infographic. Boom, knowledged. (Already sold on coming to #UpChat? Share this post so all your friends will know and maybe even chat with us too!)But before I get ahead of myself, here's the thing you wanted to learn about in the first place...

They're Just A Bunch Of Little Doodles In A Kid's Notebook. So Why Is It So Upsetting?
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Unilever

...And there's more! That's right, folks. If you're extra stoked about helping out (which, let's be real, you're awesome and probably beyond stoked), have I got something for you.


Upworthy is partnering with our good friends Unilever Project Sunlight to hold an #UpChat all about hunger in the U.S.! So mark your calendar for Thursday, Oct. 16 at 3 p.m. ET to meet up with us on Twitter, where we'll be hashing out the details (with hashtags!) and to have an enlightening chat about problems and solutions.

Have questions about what the heck an #UpChat is and/or how that works and/or how to pronounce "#"? No worries. Read on for more information!

So, um, where is this happening?

Um, somewhere amazing — otherwise known as the Internet (you know, the place where you're reading this right now) for an #UpChat!

Sounds great! But what exactly is an #UpChat? What's the deal here?

An #UpChat is just a casual chat on Twitter where we discuss a certain important topic. This particular #UpChat is brought to you by our pals at Unilever Project Sunlight and will be all about hunger in the U.S. and what we can do to help folks out. We'll be joined by a bunch of great partners, like Feeding America, and other fun people on Twitter (including you!) Basically, it's going to be really fun and really educational. And what's better than that? (Answer: nothing. #UpChats are the best.)

OK, can you tell me what I can do now?

I love your enthusiasm! The biggest, most crucial part of all this is to have people like YOU — yes, I am talking about YOU — join in and make your voice heard! Here are the three steps to get this educational party started:

1. Follow @Upworthy on Twitter.

2. Check out the #UpChat and #ShareAMeal hashtags on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 3 p.m. ET — and join in the conversation!

3. Check out all the awesome folks joining us on this handy dandy list we've compiled for you.

4. Share this post! If you're going, then share so other folks know you're coming! Can't go? That's cool too! Share this post so maybe your friends will stop by instead! The more, the merrier!

BUT I JUST CAN'T WAIT UNTIL THEN. I NEED TO DO SOMETHING NOWWWW.

I feel you. I kinda want to invent a time machine just so you and I can fast-forward to Oct. 16. But my cat ate my time-machine plans, so we're just gonna have to wait this out together. In the meantime, here's some awesome links to check out while you patiently wait for the #ShareAMeal #UpChat:

1. Learn more about child hunger here at Unilever Project Sunlight.

2. Watch this stunning, gut-wrenching video on a story that is unfortunately way too common.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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