More

They thought they were going to the shelter. They walked into a five-star restaurant. Gasps!

It was a daring prank. He took a soup kitchen and transformed it. They can't believe their eyes.

They thought they were going to the shelter. They walked into a five-star restaurant. Gasps!

Most homeless people just caught one bad break too many.

They're not bad people. They're not irresponsible. They're just unlucky.


And as a result of their bad luck, the rest of us treat them like animals. Like not having a house makes you less of a human.

They also end up eating a lot of soup.

Hey, it's calories, right?

But what if some homeless people could have a fine dining experience? The music, the white tablecloths, the candles?

Prank It Forward decided to find out. They brought in a designer to transform the space.

A professional chef and a team of volunteers prepared the most stereotypically "fancy" meal they could think of: filet mignon.

The guests couldn't believe their eyes. They were astounded that all of this was for them.

But more than the food, the string quartet, the decor ... the thing they commented on over and over was how amazing it felt to be treated with respect.

How hard is it to offer another person some dignity?

According to this video ... not that hard. Kind of fun, actually.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

Keep Reading Show less

When a mountain lion approached, Dash stood his ground unfazed.

Most of us spend our lives understanding that there is a certain order to nature. We have prey and we have predators, and some predators, like big cats in the wild, sit at the top of the chain, feared by all.

So when a big honking mountain lion, also known as a cougar or a puma, shows up on your property, it's normal to be concerned—especially if you have pets that spend time outside. Most people would find themselves sweating a bit if a cougar showed up at their door, even with a thick pane of glass between them and the big kitty. Most animals would, too, if they understood the danger of what they were looking at.

But Dash the tiny doggo is not most animals.

Dash is delighting the masses with his reaction to a mountain lion that paid his house a visit in Colorado recently. In a video shared by Sarah Bole on Facebook and then reshared on Twitter, Dash sits right up against the glass door, cool as a cucumber, as the cougar approaches. Even when the lion taps the glass with its formidable paw, Dash stands his ground, totally unfazed. While you can hear the panic in his human's voice, Dash just sits there wagging his tail.

Keep Reading Show less

This article originally appeared on 07.11.17


Madalyn Parker wanted to take a couple days off work. She didn't have the flu, nor did she have plans to be on a beach somewhere, sipping mojitos under a palm tree.

Parker, a web developer from Michigan, wanted a few days away from work to focus on her mental health.

Photo courtesy of Madalyn Parker.

Keep Reading Show less