These two posts from Arnold capture why we need clean energy now. Not in the future. Now.

The Governator says fossil fuels aren't worth 7 million sick. We don't think so either.

In case you missed it: Arnold Schwarzenegger, former governor of California and star action movies like "Terminator" and "Predator," dropped some truth bombs on Facebook Monday morning.


"I don't give a **** if we agree about climate change."

That's the title of a Facebook post by Schwarzenegger. He titled it that because, even if everything scientists are saying about climate change is completely wrong (which it's not), we should already be moving to clean energy anyway.

"Do you believe it is acceptable that 7 million people die every year from pollution?" he asks. Burning fossil fuels creates pollution, sickening and killing millions of people every year.

In China, citizens spend millions on masks, like this one, hoping to avoid air pollution. Image from Nicolò Lazzati/Flickr.

"Do you believe coal and oil will be the fuels of the future?," Schwarzenegger asks, “Besides the fact that fossil fuels destroy our lungs, everyone agrees that eventually they will run out. What's your plan then?"

As the actual definition of "renewable" would suggest, renewables won't run out. And they're usually a good deal, too — California's energy investments are already paying off.

"I don't want to be the last investor in Blockbuster as Netflix emerged," he said.

Schwarzenegger lays out some realities about climate change in his second post, a Q&A video.

Image via Arnold Schwarzenegger/Facebook.

The video features Arnold standing in front of the Arc de Triomphe, taking questions from fans. Arnold was in Paris along with the current governor of California, Jerry Brown, to give a speech at the COP21 climate change talks.

Arnold fielded these questions about subjects like how teachers can explain climate change to their students and what the average person can do about climate change, while also warning against finger-pointing and divisions both internationally and within U.S. politics.


During his tenure as governor of California, Arnold worked with businesses and legislators to incentivize clean energy. Image from Bloom Energy/Flickr.

"I don't see it as a political issue," he said. "I think the Democrats and Republicans have to work together on this. It's a people's issue."

But the best was what he'd say to the people who say fixing climate change is impossible.

"I have heard people say that it's impossible," said Arnold.

"I've heard this my whole life. I've heard 'it's impossible' my whole life about everything. If I wanted to go to America — they said it's impossible. When I wanted to be a body-building champion — they said it's impossible. When I wanted to be a movie star — they said it's impossible. When I ran for governor — they said it's impossible. So I heard it all the time."

"So I took the words 'impossible,' 'can't be done,' and 'no' out of my vocabulary," said Arnold.

Image via Arnold Schwarzenegger/Facebook.

"If we all work together we can solve this problem."

It's a great video that's well worth a watch. If you agree with Arnold that clean energy just makes sense — that fossil fuels aren't worth an estimated 7 million sick — sign this petition from the League of Conservation Voters which tells Congress to spur fossil fuels and support the EPA's Clean Power Plan.

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