Oh, Canada. Lovely land of moose and trees. What are you doing?

A lot of famous (and not-so-famous) people agree: "It's terrible."


Right now, Canada's tar sands industry chews through 34 football fields of pristine northern forest every day.

Excavating and processing to produce oil, it creates enough toxic sludge to cover Central Park 11 times every month.

It pollutes enough freshwater* to fill almost 5 million bathtubs Every. Single. Day.


Disgusting, Right?

And we haven't even talked about how it kills wildlife, has been linked with higher cancer rates, asthma, memory loss, and contaminates food for local communities.

It's just like putting 22 million more cars on the road.

Is what they do in Canada any of our business? If they want to create a toxic wasteland up there, do we have a say?

Yes, we do. And here's why.

Alberta's tar sands industry relies on pipelines to move the sludgy oil to processing facilities and ports in the Gulf of Mexico. They want a 1,179-mile pipeline in order to transport 800,000 barrels per day of heavy petroleum from the tar sands of Alberta to ports and refineries on the Gulf Coast. (That would be the green line on the map.)

Early in 2015, President Obama vetoed pipeline legislation. But he didn't deliver a final "no."

President Obama needs to kill the pipeline before he leaves office.

A lot of famous people agree.

100 celebrities, scientists, artists, elected officials, labor unions, progressive organizations, landowners, and climate activists have signed a letter for the president. Here's the video version. Share this video and share the word. The president needs to keep hearing from us. We don't need to support any more business-as-usual dirty oil production.

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*Note on freshwater pollution mentioned above: The mines pull water from the Athabasca River. In 1997, Suncor mining company admitted that their tailing ponds had been leaking 1,600 cubic meters of toxic water into the Athabasca a day. River water tested downstream of the mine contains naphthenic acid, metals such as mercury, and other nastiness. Disgusting.

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