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This video is about 3 things:

1. Being healthier.

2. Messing up the world less.

3. Being a little kinder.

Sorry, 4 things:

4. Mondays.

Americans eat more meat than just about anyone else...


...around 200 pounds a year per person. (Hm, that pretty much is a person.) That includes beef, pork, and poultry. Fish is extra.

So, what's the problem?

It's not healthy for us.

Studies have shown that eating lots of meat is linked to stuff that can kill us, like heart disease, diabetes, and some kinds of cancer.

Wanna cut back yet?

Meat production pollutes like crazy.

To meet our crazy-high demand for meat products, factory farms have become the norm, squeezing out traditional farms and polluting farmland, the air, and our rivers.

Um, gross.

Factory farming is brutal to livestock.

The treatment of factory-farm animals is just unbelievably cruel.

Did this hen give up? Or worse?

Factory-farm pigs are packed in so tightly they can't even turn around. Their whole lives.

Something needs to change.

Meatless Mondays is a start.

It's an idea that's spreading throughout the country. Cities, towns, and even some school systems are joining in.

By devoting just one day a week to non-meat foods, we reduce their consumption by a seventh — and, of course, we get the chance to enjoy the pleasures of other eats. Come Tuesday and so on, working more vegetables into our meals can help keep the ball rolling.

We can have…

Better health.

A better environment.

Better treatment of animals.

It's a win all around.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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