She took off her bra and put it over Paul Krugman's face because science.

Sometimes the best science is the mostly useless kind.

When Elena Bodnar was 23 years old, the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl exploded.

At the time, Bodnar had just graduated from medical school. She volunteered to help evacuate and treat local residents affected by the radiation.

She observed that the radioactive iodine in the air was getting into to their lungs and making them sick. Masks were not readily available.


The lack of protective gear gave her the idea: a bra that doubled as a mask.

After years of research and testing, she filed for a patent in 2004 and never looked back.

People noticed.

Is it the most practical application of science? Maybe more than you might think.

The EBra looks and costs about the same as an ordinary bra ($30) but can save two lives in the event of a emergency. The average American woman may not need an EBra, but in countries where unpredictable violent attacks are a concern (like Syria or her home country Ukraine), this could be a very helpful tool to have strapped to your body.

Necessity is the mother of invention, and this mother has a gas mask bra on.

Heroes