Keystone XL explained in the words of those who will be affected most by it.

Behind the politics, behind the posturing by oil companies and folks on Capitol Hill, behind even the economics of the Keystone XL Pipeline, there are people.


People who've farmed for generations and want to keep doing so without fear of having their waterways polluted and their way of life threatened. People who live near the source of the tar sands in Alberta, Canada. And more.



The pathway for the proposed pipeline includes Polk County, Nebraska, where Jim has farmed for decades — and before that, his ancestors and their ancestors farmed. It also includes going directly over the Ogallala Aquifer, which supplies water to over 2 million people in the plains states.

These folks understand the impact the pipeline will have on the ecology and water supply of Nebraska and other states and territories.

People like Chief Adam, who lives near the source of the tar sands oil in Alberta, Canada.

And folks like Meghan, who promises that this particular battle will not end.

For now, the Keystone XL Pipeline has been delayed after both the House and Senate approved it and President Barack Obama vetoed.

The veto held because Congress could not muster the two-thirds majority to push the bill through anyway. Now, TransCanada (the company behind this pipeline) is hoping that the next vote on KXL is delayed until after the next election, in hopes that someone favorable to Big Oil gets into office.

But even politics aren't stopping people from keeping up strong resistance.

Here's one of my favorite quotes from this clip:

Come with me now and listen to these folks tell the tale of how it will affect their lives.

For more information or to get involved, check out NoKXL.org.

Heroes