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Behind the politics, behind the posturing by oil companies and folks on Capitol Hill, behind even the economics of the Keystone XL Pipeline, there are people.


People who've farmed for generations and want to keep doing so without fear of having their waterways polluted and their way of life threatened. People who live near the source of the tar sands in Alberta, Canada. And more.



The pathway for the proposed pipeline includes Polk County, Nebraska, where Jim has farmed for decades — and before that, his ancestors and their ancestors farmed. It also includes going directly over the Ogallala Aquifer, which supplies water to over 2 million people in the plains states.

These folks understand the impact the pipeline will have on the ecology and water supply of Nebraska and other states and territories.

People like Chief Adam, who lives near the source of the tar sands oil in Alberta, Canada.

And folks like Meghan, who promises that this particular battle will not end.

For now, the Keystone XL Pipeline has been delayed after both the House and Senate approved it and President Barack Obama vetoed.

The veto held because Congress could not muster the two-thirds majority to push the bill through anyway. Now, TransCanada (the company behind this pipeline) is hoping that the next vote on KXL is delayed until after the next election, in hopes that someone favorable to Big Oil gets into office.

But even politics aren't stopping people from keeping up strong resistance.

Here's one of my favorite quotes from this clip:

Come with me now and listen to these folks tell the tale of how it will affect their lives.

For more information or to get involved, check out NoKXL.org.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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