In a world that frames people with anxiety as 'weak,' Gina Rodriguez shoves back.

"Jane the Virgin" star Gina Rodriguez recently shared a short but powerful video on Instagram.

The Golden Globe-winning actress opened up about her history with anxiety in the caption of her video contribution to Norwegian photographer Anton Soggiu's "Ten Second Portraits" project.

It's always a bit surprising to learn that people who spend their lives in front of cameras and audiences have anxiety.

But it really shouldn't be.

Anxiety disorders are extremely common, with an estimated 40 million U.S. adults experiencing them in some form or another. For many people, anxiety can be what's known as an "invisible illness." In other words, someone might be high-functioning in their professional and social lives and not ever look or act "sick" or show visible signs of an anxiety disorder.

In the 10-second clip Rodriguez shared, most of us would not be able to tell by looking at it that she was feeling nervous — she bites her lip a bit, though mostly she's smiling. But to her, the anxiety is obvious.

"Watching this clip, I could see how anxious I was, but I empathize with myself," she wrote in the caption.

Rodriguez snaps a few pictures with fans at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival. Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

There's an important piece of advice hidden in Rodriguez's message about thriving in the face of challenges.

"I wanted to protect her and tell her it's ok to be anxious, there is nothing different or strange about having anxiety and I will prevail," Rodriguez explained of watching herself in the video.

"I like watching this video," she wrote. "It makes me uncomfortable but there is a freedom I feel maybe even an acceptance. This is me."

Rodriguez and her "Jane the Virgin" co-star Jamie Camil appear on a panel at the 2017 Vulture Festival. Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images for Vulture Festival.

Different people cope with challenges in different ways, especially when it comes to the majorly stigmatized world of mental health. For Rodriguez, that means acknowledging and accepting that this is part of who she is — and in a world that paints people with anxiety, depression, or other mental illnesses as being "weak," it can be the strongest move of all.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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Despite increasing vaccine rollouts allowing us to see the light at the end of the tunnel, the loss we've experienced is immense. Having a president who not only understands loss on a personal level—having endured the tragic loss of his wife and baby daughter earlier in life and the death of his son just six years ago—but who conveys with compassion the grief of the nation as we mark this milestone is a comforting change.

Tonight, the White House honored the 500,000+ lives lost with a display of 500 candles lining the steps of the building, with each candle representing 1000 Americans. The president and first lady, along with the vice president and second gentleman, held a memorial moment of silence outside the South Portico as a military band played "Amazing Grace."

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