More

If Veterans Day Had A Soundtrack, I'd Hope These 7 Songs Would Be On It

Veterans Day is a day of celebration. And what's a celebration without a little music? Here are seven songs, handpicked by your friends at Upworthy, for almost any mood.

If Veterans Day Had A Soundtrack, I'd Hope These 7 Songs Would Be On It

Click on the song titles below to view the lyrics.

1. "War" by Edwin Starr


"It's pretty bad ass to write a song about a horrific act and manage for it to be smart and funky." — Franchesca Ramsey

2. "Blowing in the Wind" by Bob Dylan

"It's an iconic war protest song from the 1960s that just never gets old." — Brandon Weber

3. "Rooster" by Alice in Chains

"Going to war is scary, but when you're there, all you can think of is how important it is that you're there for you and the people fighting next to you to make it home to your families. But too often when you get home, people don't see you. They see politics. We can do better." — Phoebe Gavin

4. "War Pigs" by Black Sabbath

"It's rare that a war protest song doesn't have folk guitar, has you amped up, calls out the military-industrial complex, admires the poor working-class soldiers who had to do the real fighting, and completely rocks out. And yet here we are." — Adam Mordecai

5. "When the President Talks to God" by Bright Eyes

"One night in college, I tuned in a few minutes early for 'Conan' and caught the end of 'The Tonight Show.' Bright Eyes was the musical guest, and this was the song he played. I remember being absolutely blown away by its brazenness. Its I-can’t-believe-he-actually-just-said-that-on-TV honesty. Sitting there in my dorm room feeling helpless and hopeless about the war in Iraq, it was such an incredible cathartic moment — one that I’ll never forget." — Eric March

6. "Masters of War" by Pearl Jam (original by Bob Dylan)

"Pearl Jam was the band that got me hooked on rock and roll. They were wild and captivating performers. And in time, I got to know them as smart and steadfast critics of all the worst things in the world, including war and violence. There aren't many bands out there who can take on the greats of political rock, like Dylan or Springsteen, but Pearl Jam is one of 'em." — Maz Ali

7. "Fortunate Son" by Creedence Clearwater Revival

"I think about this song every time I see a veteran. If you slow it down, the lyrics'll get ya. 'It ain't me, I ain't no millionaire's son.' To me, CCR's singing about how those who GO to war to serve and the politicians who DECLARE the wars just live on completely different planets. One's a brave planet, and the other one is ... not. *shudder* That ain't right, if you ask me, and I've got family in politics AND in the military!" — Lori White

Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less
File:Delta Airlines - Boeing 767-300 - N185DN (Quintin Soloviev ...

Want to land yourself on a no-fly list? Refuse to wear a mask on an airplane. Delta is actually having to ban people from flights for not wearing masks. "As of this week, we've added 460 people to our no-fly list for refusing to comply with our mask requirement," Delta CEO Ed Bastian said in a message to employees per CNN. The number is up from 270 people in August. It's kinda nuts that people are so against covering their nose and mouth that they're actually willing to get kicked off an airline, but here we are.

We're a good seven months in to the pandemic, so having to wear some kind of protective covering isn't new anymore. Delta flights have been requiring face masks on flights since May 4th, and has been barring rule breakers from traveling since June. Delta is also one of two major U.S. airlines that keeps the middle seat open (at least until the end of 2020).

Keep Reading Show less
Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less

Electing Donald Trump to be president of the United States set an incredibly ugly example for the nation's youth.

We know how it's affected the national discourse of regular adults. But there's no denying the conduct of a president impacts how children around the world see the example being set for them. Every day for the past four years, children have been subjected to the behavior of a divisive figure that many of their parents chose to exalt to the most powerful office in the world.

Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

Keep Reading Show less

Ever wonder what happened to the real people who appeared in a fake documentary? They don't always have to cope with the aftermath of public humilation.

Jeanise Jones was told she would be participating in a documentary about child brides and women's rights. What she actually ended up appearing in was "Borat Subsequent Moviefilm," the sequel to 2006's Borat. Now, a GoFundMe for the Oklahoma grandmother set up by her pastor has raised over $130,000 after Jones told Variety she was only paid $3,600 for her appearance.

If you don't remember Jones, she was the woman tasked with babysitting Borat's daughter, Tutar, while Borat (played by Sacha Baron Cohen) attempted to make money for his daughter's plastic surgery.

"I can't say it was fair because they knew it was going to be a movie, and I didn't. I just thought I was doing a documentary about how we do things in America. But I blame myself for not reading when I signed those papers," Jones told Variety. The GoFundMe was set up after Jones lost her job of 32 years due to the pandemic.

Keep Reading Show less