Here's some great news about climate change to combat all the 'world is ending' news you always see.
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Unilever and the United Nations

News about climate change always seems to be bad news:


These are all real headlines, and the stories behind them are all true, and totally alarming ... and bad. Very bad.

So, for now, forget those.

That's not what we're here for today. This is:

It's true. Thankfully, a few of us in the world took our atmosphere issues seriously. The nonprofit organization Climate Reality reports how much has changed in the past few years. And it's so impressive. The planet is already better because of it.

Here are three pieces of good news on climate change.



1. Solar energy costs about the same or less than fossil fuels in about 79 countries.



And that number is growing.

Fact: Every hour the sun provides enough energy to meet the world's energy demands for an entire year. In a week, the sun could power the world for our entire lives and then some — 168 years. Figuring out how to harness the sun and other clean energy isn't only smart, it's environmentally friendly. AND it comes with another benefit:

(Cold, hard cash.)

Saving money and the planet at the same time? It's a win-win.

2. Since going electric, the car industry is also making more green.

Electric car sales are jumping all over the world (over 50% in France), and more and more people are buying hybrids than ever.

Tesla Motors, an all-electric vehicle company, turned its first profit in 2013 after 10 years of financial hardship. When Tesla stated in 2003, it didn't sell too many cars ... for about a decade. Now that the reason to go electric is clearer (and the cars are becoming more affordable), they're going like lightning. Nikola would be so proud.


Tesla Motors now makes the best-selling electric car on the market: the Model S.

3. With the energy industry growing, employment in those fields is growing as well.

And they're growing a lot. In 2013, 6.5 million people were employed by the renewable energy industry. Wind energy is growing too — Iowa's wind-power industry employs 6,000 people. Iowa gets almost 30% of its electricity from wind.

These people will help our world stay in good shape, and they get paid in the process.

Climate change has caused some amazingly bad news. But we're starting to fight back.

That's what could slow climate change down to nothing — and it'll be the best news about it anyone will ever hear.

Watch the full video below:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.